Interview with the Vampire, Paperback Book

Interview with the Vampire Paperback

Part of the The Vampire Chronicles series

2.5 out of 5 (4 ratings)

Description

In a darkened room a young man sits telling the macabre and eerie story of his life - the story of a vampire, gifted with eternal life, cursed with an exquisite craving for human blood.

Anne Rice's compulsively readable novel is arguably the most celebrated work of vampire fiction since Bram Stoker's Dracula was published in 1897.

As the Washington Post said on its first publication, it is a 'thrilling, strikingly original work of the imagination ...sometimes horrible, sometimes beautiful, always unforgettable'.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Classic horror & ghost stories
  • ISBN: 9780751541977

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by
3

My blood lust for reading about vampires has been well and truly sated, but I had to give <i>Interview with a Vampire</i> a try before moving on. The film adaptation, with Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise, has never appealed to me - Hollywood gothic doesn't really work - but the original novels are such a classic staple of the genre, that I felt like I was missing out in some way. In the foreword to my library edition, Audrey Niffenegger suggests that Ann Rice 'discovered' the 'existential despair, the tedium and attractions of immortality, the moral quandaries of the vampire diet'. And interviewee Louis is certainly a literary template for vampire angst - he never shuts up! For three hundred pages, give or take incidences of death, destruction and relocation to a different country, Louis harps on mortal sin, God and the devil, love and hate, the beauty of life, the futility and torture of immortality, and how lonely undeath can be. Whenever Lestat threatened to put an end to his 'suffering', I was thinking, 'Yes, please, do!'The premise of a centuries-old vampire telling his story to a 'modern day' mortal is simple and satisfying, and Louis' narrative voice is a suitable blend of nineteenth century formality and cynical experience, but his 'existential despair' gets boring very quickly. I prefer the truly evil vampires, like Lestat, who accept what they are and kill to survive, not dithering do-gooders who don't want to hurt anyone. Get over yourself, Louis. And pint-size vampirette Claudia, who does have a valid complaint after all, is a disturbing character - a grown woman trapped in the body of a five year old. I had trouble imagining what she would look like, dressed up like a doll and coming onto Louis (*shudder*).Although this is only the first novel in the series, <i>Interview</i> must be the last nail in my vampire coffin. I have absolutely no desire to read about Lestat or Armand, sorry to say!

Review by
1

Not really my thing to be brutally honest. I know this is credited as the original of the whole vamp thing, <i>not including Bram Stoker</i> but it just doesn't do it for me. I'm happy I gave it a go but really, is it any better than the other vamp books people like to bitch about? My conclusion: <i>hell no</i>.

Review by
3

This was the first book to present vampires in the modern light that we think of them today.<br/><br/>I had watched the movie before reading this book which I wish I never did because the book did not shock me like it should have done. <br/><br/>The book mainly centers around Louis, a vampire telling the story of his life to 'the boy' who is recording him in the 1980s. Louis is quite a depressing character and the phrase 'wet blanket' comes to mind. He has had a hard life as his vampire nature has tortured him for centuries. Unlike normal vampires, Louis is very much in touch with his human nature and feels great empathy for all the suffering caused by vampirekind.<br/><br/>Louis is to be honest the most boring vampire, he is very apathetic, brooding - a kind of Hamlet character. He watches events unfold around him without actually trying to stop anything - the whole Claudia disaster is proof of that and he lets Lestat (his maker) completely overtake his life and dictate what they are to do.<br/><br/>I would have really enjoyed this book if I had not watched the movie but I am intrigued to read the sequels as I really want to find out what happens next.

Review by
3

This was the first book to present vampires in the modern light that we think of them today.<br/><br/>I had watched the movie before reading this book which I wish I never did because the book did not shock me like it should have done. <br/><br/>The book mainly centers around Louis, a vampire telling the story of his life to 'the boy' who is recording him in the 1980s. Louis is quite a depressing character and the phrase 'wet blanket' comes to mind. He has had a hard life as his vampire nature has tortured him for centuries. Unlike normal vampires, Louis is very much in touch with his human nature and feels great empathy for all the suffering caused by vampirekind.<br/><br/>Louis is to be honest the most boring vampire, he is very apathetic, brooding - a kind of Hamlet character. He watches events unfold around him without actually trying to stop anything - the whole Claudia disaster is proof of that and he lets Lestat (his maker) completely overtake his life and dictate what they are to do.<br/><br/>I would have really enjoyed this book if I had not watched the movie but I am intrigued to read the sequels as I really want to find out what happens next.

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