The Power of Five: Oblivion, Paperback

The Power of Five: Oblivion Paperback

Part of the The Power of Five series

3.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


Having escaped from Hong Kong, the five gatekeepers - Matt, Pedro, Scott, Jamie and Scarlett - are lost in a hostile and dangerous world.

As they struggle to re-group and plan their next move, the malevolent King of the Old Ones gathers his forces in Oblivion: a desolate landscape where the last survivors of humanity must fight the ultimate battle.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Walker Books Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Fantasy
  • ISBN: 9781406327441



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Oblivion, the final volume of Anthony Horowitz’s Power of Five Quintet which started in 2005, is a hefty read and like many conclusions, leaves the reader with an unsatisfying sense of anti-climax. Horowitz is probably the best young adult’s author of the day and while this series started on a high note, the books grew longer and more unwieldy, with a four year gap between the nearly 700 page Oblivion and the previous tome. The overlong mish mash is none-the-less compulsively readable of course, with hints of Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness with its Antarctic setting and the Old Ones parallel the monstrous Elder Things. Tolkien’s here too as the companions face obstacles in their environmental and quasi-spiritual quest, while the themes of willing sacrifice, betrayal, redemption and resurrection come straight from the Gospels. The Five Gatekeepers undergo a series of travails that would put Christian from The Pilgrim’s Progress to shame: separated by continents they negotiate genteel cannibals from the English Home Counties to slavers in the Amazon to megalomaniacs in an eerily deserted Dubai. Can Oblivion be enjoyed without reading [or rereading] the first four books? Yes, new readers are brought up to speed quite subtly and there is an engrossing host of new independent adventures and characters.It’s not a patch on the first three books but that level of excitement is difficult to sustain: besides, Horowitz is such a talented writer he could make a page-tuner out of a telephone directory – and Oblivion is better than any directory.

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