Shipwrecks of Kent, Paperback


Kent has witnessed the passing of ships since the beginning of recording history.

The Romans landed there, and armed vessels from Spain, Holland, France and Germany have threatened its shores.

As London became the major seaport of the realm, the maritime trade of the nation passed through its coastal waters.

With so many ships passing along the coast of Kent, inevitably there have been many shipwrecks, particularly on the infamous Goodwin Sands and the outlying banks of the Thames estuary.

Some in these have been tragic in nature, while others have included an element of comedy.

This compilation of 200 photographs, drawn from many sources, provides a reminder of many of the more famous wrecks in the area.

It also includes some not so familiar disasters from the past and describes some strange coincidences that have occurred over the last two centuries.

Simplified charts are included to give an idea of the perils of the coastline and also the effectiveness of the German mining campaign in the Second World War. In addition to ships that got into difficulties, lifeboats and their crews that helped to rescue men under the most awful conditions of weather have a special place in this pictorial account.

Famous rescues like the Northern Belle and Indian Chief are recorded, and modern disasters, such as the explosion and sinking of the Texaco Caribbean, which set in motion a programme for safer navigation of the crowded English Channel, are given special coverage.

The result is a portrait of the battle between men and the sea.

In many cases it was the sea that won. It is also a tribute to those of the lifeboat service who risked their lives so that others in distress might be saved.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 128 pages, 200ill.
  • Publisher: The History Press Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Maritime history
  • ISBN: 9780752417202



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