Information Rules : A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy, Hardback

Information Rules : A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy Hardback

3.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


In Information Rules, authors Shapiro and Varian reveal that many classic economic concepts can provide the insight and understanding necessary to succeed in the information age.

They argue that if managers seriously want to develop effective strategies for competing in the new economy, they must understand the fundamental economics of information technology.

Whether information takes the form of software code or recorded music, is published in a book or magazine, or even posted on a website, managers must know how to evaluate the consequences of pricing, protecting, and planning new versions of information products, services, and systems.

The first book to distill the economics of information and networks into practical business strategies, Information Rules is a guide to the winning moves that can help business leaders navigate successfully through the tough decisions of the information economy.


  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 368 pages, Illustrations
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Business strategy
  • ISBN: 9780875848631



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This is an absolute classic, and 10 years after publication still has relevant and critical information in each chapter. Perhaps a more up-to-date monograph for many topics would be Judo Strategy. However, the topics like Pricing, Standards Wars, Managing Lock-In are so relevant. Put this book together with The Innovator's Dilemma, Judo Strategy, and a few other tomes is enough to arm the new software entrepreneur. On the downside, the book is a little naive at times about the hardcore business and competitiveness of software, which is probably due to the authors being academics. An excellent strategy book, readable, and definitely specific to software.

Also by Carl Shapiro