The Shaping of Middle-Earth : The Quenta, the Ambarkanta and the Annals, Together with the Earliest 'Silmarillion' and the First Map, Paperback

The Shaping of Middle-Earth : The Quenta, the Ambarkanta and the Annals, Together with the Earliest 'Silmarillion' and the First Map Paperback

Part of the The History of Middle-Earth series

4 out of 5 (1 rating)

Description

The fourth volume that contains the early myths and legends which led to the writing of Tolkien's epic tale of war, The Silmarillion.

In this fourth volume of The History of Middle-earth, the shaping of the chronological and geographical structure of the legends of Middle-earth and Valinor is spread before us. We are introduced to the hitherto unknown Ambarkanta or "Shape of the World", the only account ever given of the nature of the imagined Universe, ccompanied by maps and diagrams of the world before and after the cataclyusms of The War of the Gods and the Downfall of Numenor.

The first map of Beleriend is also reproduced and discussed. In The Annals of Valinor and The Annals of Beleriend we are shown how the chronology of the First Age was moulded: and the tale is told of Aelfwine, the Englishman who voyaged into the True West and came to Tol Eressea, Lonely Isle, where he learned the ancient history of Elves and Men. Also included are the original 'Silmarillion' of 1926, and the Quenta Noldorinwa of 1930 - the only version of the myths and legends of the First Age that J R R Tolkien completed to their end.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 400 pages, Index
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Fantasy
  • ISBN: 9780261102187

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Again, haven't read the whole thing cover to cover, but this one's worth mentioning because of "Dagor Dagorath", which sounds pretty close to the Old Norse Ragnarøkkr. It'd be the version with renewal, of course, not the posited version in which there's Ragnarøkkr and that's that, but still...<br/><br/>Interesting that he takes so much from pagan sources, given the Christian slant of the rest.

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