Emperor: the Blood of Gods (Emperor Series, Book 5), Paperback

Emperor: the Blood of Gods (Emperor Series, Book 5) Paperback

4 out of 5 (2 ratings)


The epic new novel in Conn Iggulden's bestselling EMPEROR series, featuring a new short story by the author.

Julius Caesar has been assassinated. A nation is in mourning. Revenge will be bloody. Rome's great hero Julius Caesar has been brutally murdered by his most trusted allies.

While these self-appointed Liberatores seek refuge in the senate, they have underestimated one man: Caesar's adopted son Octavian, a man whose name will echo through history as Augustus Caesar.

Uniting with his great rival Mark Antony, Octavian will stop at nothing to seek retribution from the traitors and avenge his father's death.

His greatest hatred is reserved for Brutus, Caesar's childhood friend and greatest ally, now leader of the conspirators.

As the people take to the streets of Rome, the Liberatores must face their fate.

Some flee the city; others will not escape mob justice.

Not a single one will die a natural death. And the reckoning will come for Brutus on the sweeping battlefield at Philippi.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 512 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Historical fiction
  • ISBN: 9780007482825



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

In this book Iggulden begins with Caesar's assassination and then moulds Octavian's character as he deals with these tumultuous events that eventually see him succeed Caesar after his campaign of revenge against the Liberatores is complete. Octavian, as has been said, is given new depth in the book and his relationship with Marc Anthony is quite interesting. There is good characterisation of the minor players also and the plot and the battle scenes are pacey as one would expect from past experience.

Review by

Having read the previous 4 installments (and the whole of the Conqueror series too!) I was tailor made to enjoy this book.Not quite as strong as the rest in the series, not surprising given that we had 4 books to establish ourselves with Julius and Brutus and scarcely 4 chapters for us to build the same rapport with Agrippa and Maecenas, the book is still hugely enjoyable as it brings us up to the events of Phillippi and the final defeat of the Libertatores.Having recently enjoyed the excellent podcast series "The History of Rome" I wonder if there exists a similar psuedo-fictional timeline of Ancient Rome encompassing a number of various authors creations, i.e. I, Claudius etc...