Mrs Tim of the Regiment, Paperback
5 out of 5 (1 rating)


Vivacious, young Hester Christie tries to run her home like clockwork, as would befit the wife of British Army officer, Tim Christie.

However hard Mrs Tim strives for seamless living amidst the other army wives, she is always moving flat-out to remember groceries, rule lively children, side-step village gossip and placate her husband with bacon, eggs, toast and marmalade.

Left alone for months at a time whilst her husband is with his regiment, Mrs Tim resolves to keep a diary of events large and small in her family life.

Once pen is set to paper no affairs of the head or heart are overlooked. When a move to a new regiment in Scotland uproots the Christie family, Mrs Tim is hurled into a whole new drama of dilemmas; from settling in with a new set whilst her husband is away, to disentangling a dear friend from an unsuitable match.

Against the wild landscape of surging rivers, sheer rocks and rolling mists, who should stride into Mrs Tim's life one day but the dashing Major Morley, hellbent on pursuit of our charming heroine. And Hester will soon find that life holds unexpected crossroads...Mrs Tim of the Regiment is part of The Bloomsbury Group, a new library of books from the early twentieth-century chosen by readers for readers.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Classic fiction (pre c 1945)
  • ISBN: 9781408803462



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Mrs Tim's diary is a lovely account of life as an officer's wife in the 1930s. A fictionalised and expanded-upon version of Stevenson's own diaries, it's charming and humorous, and full of wonderful characters. Hester Christie is simultaneously very practical and switched-on, and completely oblivious to some of the undercurrents swirling around her. Her family and friends are (mostly) lovely, and her descriptions of all their (mostly) quiet, domestic adventures are most pleasing to read. I particularly liked this style of humour: "'I suppose you'll have no further use for us after Friday,' Guthrie says, looking up from a plate piled with bacon, and running with tomato juice. 'Once that husband of yours is here, we lesser mortals will have to take a back seat.' I reply primly that Tim and I are old married folk, and completely inured to each other's charms. 'Look at her, mother - she's blushing,' says the dreadful man with a grin. 'I'm not blushing,' I retort indignantly. 'My skin is so fair that when I eat tomatoes they show through.'" (p. 297) Those who enjoyed Diary of a Provincial Lady, Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, Stevenson's own Miss Buncle's Book or anything by Barbara Pym should definitely track down a copy of Mrs Tim at the earliest possible moment. I really hope that the remaining Mrs Tim books are reprinted.

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