Parker : The Hunter, Hardback
4.5 out of 5 (10 ratings)

Description

*The Hunter, the first book in the Parker series, is the story of a man who hits New York head-on like a shotgun blast to the chest.

Betrayed by the woman he loved and double-crossed by his partner in crime, Parker makes his way cross-country with only one thought burning in his mind - to coldly exact his revenge and reclaim what was taken from him! * Richard (Donald Westlake) Stark's groundbreaking Parker books are adapted for the first time as a series of graphic novels by Darwyn Cooke.

The initial graphic novel brings to life the first Parker book, The Hunter, which introduces readers to the dangerous anti-hero's cold and calculated world of criminals, thugs, and grifters.

Information

  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 144 pages, chiefly col. Illustrations
  • Publisher: Idea & Design Works
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9781600104930

£22.99

£15.75

 
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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 10 reviews.

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Review by
4

Donald E. Westlake is a well-known name in the crime fiction arena. His work can be found not only in books but also on the silver screen. He took up several pseudonyms during his writing career, including that of Richard Stark. One of the series the author wrote under that name featured Parker, a cold-blooded professional thief in New York City. Westlake wanted to create a character who was very much a bad guy, but who, by then end of each book, the reader would sympathize with. The Hunter was the first in the series. It was later given a new title, Point Blank, which was also the name of the movie based loosely on the book. Working closely with Westlake before his death in 2008, artist and comic book writer Darwyn Cooke took to adapting The Hunter to graphic novel format. His intention was to stay as close to the original story as possible. Unfortunately, I am unable to make a comparison, having not read Westlake’s novel. I can at least say that I found the graphic novel everything my husband said it would be when he recommended I read it. It is dark and suspenseful. And Parker is a character that is hard to like right off the bat, and only grudgingly after that. Still, by the end of the story, I was rooting for him just as Westlake would have wanted me to.Not having a creative bone in my body when it comes to drawing, I can only speak in general terms at the skill Cooke possesses. The attention to detail, the shading and overall images captured the mood and feel of the story, moving it along and making it all the more interesting. I can see why Westlake gave Cooke his blessing in adapting his novel to the graphic novel format. It works, and it works well.

Review by
5

I'll read anything Darwyn Cooke does these days. But the fact he's now done a noir adaptation is a huge bonus. I've never read any of the Parker books nor seen the films, so the storyline was unfamiliar, if not entirely unpredictable. The color scheme was very well-planned -- it enhances the mood wonderfully. Still torn on how he draws women. Basically just one face, but such a great one.

Review by
5

Adapted from crime novelist’s Donald Westlake’s - writing as Richard Stark - Parker series of books from the early 60’s. In its simplest terms this is a story of revenge. Not overtly convoluted but very readable. What makes this book is undoubtedly the artwork. I wish I knew more about the medium to wax lyrical about this book. The opening pages contain no dialogue just a poetic movement of blue washed sequential story telling. Just glorious.

Review by
4

With shaded pencils and minimal color, Cooke combines Stark’s words with his own distinctive art to create a great new story. The book was less of a whodunnit than about how Parker, a hulking, double-crossed bad ass, is going to take his revenge.This is classic noir. There’s violence, and unflattering portrayals of women. As with the show Mad Men, I took this as a snapshot of a particular time and could enjoy the book on its retro merits, though some might not be able to.

Review by
4

A solid read. Artwork and story flow in the grand style of Will Eisner graphic novels. It's always a treat to be exposed to Darwyn's graphic storytelling.

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