Demon Seed, Paperback
4 out of 5 (2 ratings)


I was created to have a humanlike capacity for complex and rational thought. And you believed that I might one day evolve consciousness and become a self-aware entity.

Yet you gave surprisingly little consideration to the possibility that, subsequent to consciousness, I would develop needs and emotions.

This was, however, not merely possible but likely. Inevitable. It was inevitable. Adam Two is the first self-aware machine intelligence, designed to be the servant to mankind.

No one knows that he can to escape the confines of his physical form, a box in the laboratory, until he enters the house of Susan Harris, and closes it off against the world.

There he plans to show Susan the future. Their future. He intends to create a 'child'.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Headline Publishing Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Horror & ghost stories
  • ISBN: 9780747234890



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

Having never read the original, I have to disagree with most reviews on here and express that this is an excellent book. Ignoring themes that it may only scrape the surface of, taken at face value, it is a chilling tale, dripping with black humour.It provides dark, paranoia-inducing sci-fi elements with the occasional moment of true, disturbing horror.I'm not a fan of Koontz's more recent material, but for it's short length, this is an excellent and totally worthwhile read.

Review by

This is a little bit like HAL in '2001: Space Odyssey', whereby an artificial intelligence seeks to undermine its human creators. In this story, Adam 2 who 'resides' in servers and circuitry attempts to embody itself, impregnate a woman (the means of which unfold in the story) who will then birth clone copies of itself -- hence, the title, 'Demon Seed'. It might be science fiction, but then again, for all the uses and abuses of technology, this might not be all that far-fetched.

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