Writing the Breakout Novel : Winning Advice from a Top Agent and His Best-selling Client, Paperback

Writing the Breakout Novel : Winning Advice from a Top Agent and His Best-selling Client Paperback

4.5 out of 5 (14 ratings)

Description

Take your fiction to the next level! Maybe you're a first-time novelist looking for practical guidance.

Maybe you've already been published, but your latest effort is stuck in mid-list limbo.

Whatever the case may be, author and literary agent Donald Maass can show you how to take your prose to the next level and write a breakout novel - one that rises out of obscurity and hits the best-seller lists.

Maass details the elements that all breakout novels share - regardless of genre - then shows you writing techniques that can make your own books stand out and succeed in a crowded marketplace. You'll learn to: * establish a powerful and sweeping sense of time and place * weave subplots into the main action for a complex, engrossing story * create larger-than-life characters that step right off the page * explore universal themes that will interest a broad audience of readers * sustain a high degree of narrative tension from start to finish * develop an inspired premise that sets your novel apart from the competition Then, using examples from the recent works of several best-selling authors - including novelist Anne Perry - Maass illustrates methods for upping the ante in every aspect of your novel writing.

You'll capture the eye of an agent, generate publisher interest and lay the foundation for a promising career.

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 14 reviews.

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Review by
5

The only non-fiction book this month worth mentioning. The Don, as conferencees have taken to calling him, is an eye-opener. not only is he charismatic and funny (I think I made people sick with quoting him for weeks after the conference), he also knows his stuff. He's an interesting orator, and the things he had to say were relevant. I had started reading his book in preparation for the workshop, but only afterwards did it really make sense. I need to reread this again now, with different notes. To date, this is the best and most useful book on writing fiction I've read. It's not comfortable, and that's why it's brilliant. I don't need a book to tell me I'm already doing alright.

Review by
5

Probably THE book to have if you can only afford one for your writing library. Donald succeeds in demonstrating pretty exactly what makes a breakout novel different from any other novel and what you must do to attain that goal.

Review by
5

The only non-fiction book this month worth mentioning. The Don, as conferencees have taken to calling him, is an eye-opener. not only is he charismatic and funny (I think I made people sick with quoting him for weeks after the conference), he also knows his stuff. He's an interesting orator, and the things he had to say were relevant. I had started reading his book in preparation for the workshop, but only afterwards did it really make sense. I need to reread this again now, with different notes. To date, this is the best and most useful book on writing fiction I've read. It's not comfortable, and that's why it's brilliant. I don't need a book to tell me I'm already doing alright.

Review by
4

The best book I've read on writing fiction. There are no magic bullets here, but Maas gives sound advice and avoids the dull uber-wisdom of some of the classics like Story and The Writer's Journey

Review by
4.5

I read the blog of an editor who once offered this rule of thumb: Pay attention to <i>who</i> is offering advice on writing. They should either be an author you admire or someone who has gained best-selling status or someone who is or has been a gatekeeper--an acquiring editor or agent. In that regard, he particularly cited this book by Donald Mass, a literary agent for such best-selling clients as Anne Perry, who wrote the introduction.I think a lot of these strategies aren't just geared towards selling well, but just plain writing well--how to take your skills to the next level. He deals with every facet of technique: stakes, setting, characters, plots, subplots, theme, etc. I particularly liked that he grounded his precepts with a wealth of examples from bestselling novels. And the checklists at the end of each chapter help a lot in absorbing the lessons and in review. I'd say this is one of those basics that should be on any aspiring writer's bookshelf.

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