Blue Labyrinth, Paperback
4 out of 5 (1 rating)


A corpse, stiff with rigor mortis and bound in heavy ropes, has been dumped on the doorstep of FBI Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast.

The murder has the hallmarks of the perfect crime - no witnesses, no motive, no evidence - save for one enigmatic clue: a piece of turquoise lodged in the stomach of the deceased.

The gem leads Pendergast to an abandoned mine on the shore of California's desolate Salton Sea where an ingenious killer is determined to make him pay for the long-buried sins of his forefathers.

But Pendergast already knows what is at stake, for the dead man left on his doorstep wasn't just anyone, it was his son.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Head of Zeus
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9781784081102



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In which our hero finds his humility. Of course, teaching Aloysius Pendergast a lesson is no small task. To get his attention, his sociopathic son Alban is delivered on his door step, quite dead. Who could best this rival of Pendergast himself? The clues lead to an abandon resort town in New Mexico, where he smells lilies...Pendergast is plagued by the doings of long-dead ancestors more than any other character in literature. It seems one of these ancestors who also happens to take credit for the large fortune Pendergast enjoys was something of a snake oil salesman. Except the snake oil worked for a time...then it killed the user. Oops. A cure came too late to save his own wife, and besides, one of the ingredients was a plant now extinct.Pendergast is actually incapacitated through a large portion of the end game in this book, his ward, Constanza, taking the lead role. Which is fine, she is every bit as competent as Pendergast himself when it comes to MacGuyvering her way out of a tough situation. She certainly knows how to rack up a body count. In the end, Pendergast takes responsibility for his ancestor's crimes and does what he feels is the right thing, something he didn't do when he vanquished another ancient ancestor earlier in the series. When called on it, he said he'd rather live with the guilt than live as a pauper. At least he's not disingenuous.

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