The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes : Whitechapel Horrors, Paperback

The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes : Whitechapel Horrors Paperback

4.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


Grotesque murders are being committed on the streets of Whitechapel.

Sherlock Holmes comes to believe they are the skilful work of one man, a man who earns the gruesome epithet of Jack the Ripper.

As the investigation proceeds, Holmes realizes that the true identity of the Ripper puts much more at stake than just catching a killer...


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9781848567498



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

I very much enjoyed this tale of Holmes' encounter with perhaps the most famous murderer of all time. Unusually the novel is written in the third person rather than the traditional first person. Whilst initially disconcerting, the pace of the story soon takes over. Hanna as done an admirable job of fitting a fictional story around non-fictional events and does so in a plausible way.Unfortunately Hanna (or his publishers) have made the capital mistake of failing to employ an English editor. There are more than a few instances in the text of 'Americanisms' in characters speech that just don't ring true for Victorian period London. 'Gotten' for one, 'garbage strewn' for another. The text would really benefit from a general tidy-up in this regard.Still, that aside, the story is exciting and pacy, the atmosphere of the poverty stricken and dangerous East End is drawn in a convincing way and the climax is fitting to the subject matter. Recommended for any Holmes fan, or anyone who enjoys a good period detective novel.

Review by

Excellent, thoroughly researched for historical accuracy, down to the actual restaurants mentioned in the book. A tour du force of late Victorian England and the horrors of living in the Whitechappel district. Many appearances of historical figures. Leave the reader to wonder whether Holmes identified the Ripper or not (the book must conform to historical fact). Includes virtually every fact contained in police investigations of the Ripper. Think of it as a documentary, as well as a novel.

Also by Edward B. Hanna