The Curse of the Pharaohs, Paperback

The Curse of the Pharaohs Paperback

Part of the Amelia Peabody series

3.5 out of 5 (3 ratings)


Join our plucky Victorian Egyptologist , together with her devastatingly handsome and brilliant husband Radcliffe, in another exciting escapade When Lady Baskerville's husband Sir Henry dies after discovering what may have been an undisturbed royal tomb in Luxor, she appeals to eminent archaeologist Radcliffe Emerson and his wife Amelia to take over the excavation.

Amid rumours of a curse haunting all those involved with the dig, the intrepid couple proceeds to Egypt, where they begin to suspect that Sir Henry did not die a natural death, and they are confident that the accidents that plague the dig are caused by a sinister human element, not a pharoah's curse


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9781845293871



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Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by

Set some five years after the events of "Crocodile on the Sandbank" Amelia and Emerson are now happily married, have settled in the Kent countryside and are doting parents to the tyrannically charming Ramses. The sudden death of Lord Baskerville the day after he opens up a tomb in Luxor, which is closely followed by the disappearance of his assistant, Alan Armadale (I love the literary references here) fills the press with rumours of a 'Curse of the Pharaohs. So Emerson and Amelia travel to Luxor determined to excavate the tomb, discover why Baskerville died and in the process dispel the myth of the curse. Along the way there are some hilarious encounters and some wonderfully funny and witty asides from Amelia. Its really nice to see that marriage and motherhood haven't diminished Amelia's sense of humour or her ability to wield a parasol. Superb.

Review by

Even better than the first novel in the series. Full-steam-ahead Peabody and her gruff husband Emerson - who I imagine as a bluff Bill Travers or young Peter O'Toole. The series has been described elsewhere as a Victorian Scooby-Do, which I think sums it up, plus you get an Egyptian tomb excavated, and the identity of the serial killer keeps you entertainingly guessing.

Review by

I enjoyed the book, but I'm not quite sure why. The dig was not remarkable. There were so many characters, it was difficult to keep the "who's who" list up-to-date. Even the corpses began to pile up! Yet, I like Peabody and Emerson--and I look forward to the next installment when the precocious Ramses will join the quest.

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