Something Blue, Paperback Book
3.5 out of 5 (4 ratings)

Description

Thirty years old, successful and stunning, Darcy Rhone used to think that 'being down and out' meant not finding a size four at the Barney's Warehouse Sale.

Now she is pregnant, unmarried and recovering from a broken engagement to Dex and the betrayal of her ex-best friend Rachel, who stole Dex's affections.

For the first time in her life, she is completely alone.

Frantically casting around for help, she calls upon Ethan, an old high school friend, and convinces him to let her stay with him in London for a few weeks to get her act together.

Little does she know what she's in for when she boards the plane to cross the Atlantic, but as weeks turn into months, Darcy makes a surprising discovery.

Preparing for motherhood and settling into a new career, she builds herself a new life from scratch, finally finding romance - in the most unexpected place ...

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by
3

I, like so many others, loved Something Borrowed. Emily Giffin has a tendency, as far as I can see, to write about not really likeable characters. I didn't much care for her last heroine on a connection level, and this time, the tale is about the last novel's antagonist. While it was certainly a good book and I read it in one sitting, it wasn't very satisfying. yes, the evil woman reforms in the end and gets the nice guy, but I don't know. There was something missing for me. it reminded me a little bit of Sophie Kinsella.

Review by
3

The sequel to Something Borrowed. I liked it a lot. Yes it was predictable, and yes, Darcy meets a whole lot of rich people that I just never seem to bump into, but there are also some realistic sides to the story. I finished it in almost one go.

Review by
4

This is the sequel to Something Borrowed, and brings Darcy centre stage. From the first book, we know that she is self absorbed, selfish, fairly deluded and expects perfect things to happen to her. I must admit, I was more reluctant to pick up this book having come down firmly on the side of Rachel in the first novel, but Giffin's writing pulled me in and I found myself completely entranced by the story of Darcy.The book is almost split into two parts. The first deals with Darcy's life immediately after she finds out of the betrayal by Rachel and Dex. We watch as she tries to make a new life with Marcus, but she soon realises that she was suffering very much from a 'grass is greener' attitude and that Dex might have been the better option. We suffer through a toe-curlingly embarrassing scene as Darcy tries to win Dex back. Her lying and insufferable attitude to relationships and imminent motherhood create the Darcy we loved to hate from Something Borrowed.However, in the second part of the book Darcy moves to London to try and make a new life, and moves in with Ethan, her childhood friend. It takes an explosive scene between Darcy and Ethan to make her realise that she is about to become a mother and needs to make some changes to her life. I loved the fact that Darcy really changed over the course of this book, and learnt that appearances really aren't everything. She was still the Darcy who loved luxurious things, and the Darcy who would explode in a temper, but she mellowed hugely and became a true mother.Sure, there are a number of imperfections in the book. It does provide a fairytale ending, and Giffin clearly wasn't concerned with the accuracies of moving to a different country to live, but I feel these are minor gripes. The course of the book deals with maturity, motherhood and coming to terms with a new life. The main character had a true epiphany and became a better person for it.When all is said and done, it's still a chick lit book, but definitely more honest and revealing than most. It says a lot that, having read both Something Borrowed and Something Blue, I am now going out to pick up the other books written by this author. Quality work.

Review by
3

I, like so many others, loved Something Borrowed. Emily Giffin has a tendency, as far as I can see, to write about not really likeable characters. I didn't much care for her last heroine on a connection level, and this time, the tale is about the last novel's antagonist. While it was certainly a good book and I read it in one sitting, it wasn't very satisfying. yes, the evil woman reforms in the end and gets the nice guy, but I don't know. There was something missing for me. it reminded me a little bit of Sophie Kinsella.

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