The Sleep Room, Paperback Book
4 out of 5 (1 rating)

Description

As haunting as Susan Hill's The Woman in Black and as dark as James Herbert's The Secret of Crickley Hall, F.

R. Tallis's The Sleep Room is where your nightmares begin ...When promising psychiatrist, James Richardson, is offered the job opportunity of a lifetime, he is thrilled.

Setting off to take up his post at Wyldehope Hall in deepest Suffolk, Richardson doesn't look back.

One of his tasks is to manage a controversial project - a pioneering therapy in which extremely disturbed patients are kept asleep for months.

As Richardson settles into his new life, he begins to sense something uncanny about the sleeping patients - six women, forsaken by society.

Why is the trainee nurse so on edge when she spends nights alone with them? And what can it mean when all the sleepers start dreaming at the same time?

It's not long before Richardson finds himself questioning everything he knows about the human mind as he attempts to uncover the shocking secrets of The Sleep Room . .

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Pan Macmillan
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Horror & ghost stories
  • ISBN: 9781447204992

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4

From the Doctor of Fear, comes the horror story that everyone is dreaming about

As haunting as Susan Hill’s The Woman in Black and as dark as James Herbert's The Secret of Crickley Hall, F. R. Tallis’s The Sleep Room is where your nightmares begin . . .

When promising psychiatrist, James Richardson, is offered the job opportunity of a lifetime, he is thrilled. Setting off to take up his post at Wyldehope Hall in deepest Suffolk, Richardson doesn’t look back.

One of his tasks is to manage a controversial project – a pioneering therapy in which extremely disturbed patients are kept asleep for months. As Richardson settles into his new life, he begins to sense something uncanny about the sleeping patients – six women, forsaken by society. Why is the trainee nurse so on edge when she spends nights alone with them? And what can it mean when all the sleepers start dreaming at the same time?

It's not long before Richardson finds himself questioning everything he knows about the human mind as he attempts to uncover the shocking secrets of The Sleep Room . . .



I really liked The Forbidden by this author, a tale of paranoia and madness which had a fab cover. I don't know why Pan decided to change the image of this author with a lurid thriller-esque cover for the Sleep Room.

Anyway if you are a fan of slow burning tale that is the stuff of nightmares you won't be disappointed. The book starts off with a focus on the dubious and controversial medical practices, slowly but steadily turns into something completely different, becomeing darker and darker as you turn each page.

Wonderful atmospherical writing...

"I stepped down onto a platform shrouded in mist. Stressed metal groaned, flashes of firelight emanated from the cab, and glowing cinders formed chaotic constellations above the smokestack. The effect was vaguely diabolical." (p.13)

..and I loved this quote that stayed with me for a while...

“A man dreams that he is a butterfly, and in the dream he has no knowledge of his life as a human being. When he wakes up he asks himself two questions: am I a man, who just dreamed that he was a butterfly? Or am I really a butterfly, now dreaming that I am a man?”

"Tallis has based his novel on the controversial psychiatrist William Sargant and his advocacy of narcosis or deep sleep therapy, a treatment developed in the 1920s which involved putting ‘problem’ patients to sleep for long periods of time, sometimes months, in the hope of alleviating their symptoms.

Sargant carried out his therapy on Ward 5 of the Royal Waterloo Hospital in London, which became known as the sleep room and, for Tallis, conjured up haunting images of a darkened ward full of slumbering patients… and became the defining motif of his engrossing novel."

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