Flashman and the Angel of the Lord (the Flashman Papers, Book 9), Paperback

Flashman and the Angel of the Lord (the Flashman Papers, Book 9) Paperback

Part of the The Flashman Papers series

3.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)

Description

Coward, scoundrel, lover and cheat, but there is no better man to go into the jungle with.

Join Flashman on his adventures as he survives fearful ordeals and outlandish perils across the four corners of the world.

A hasty retreat from the boudoir would normally suffice when caught with a wanton young wife.

But when her husband turns out to be a high court judge, a change of continents is called for, as Flashman sets off to America again.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 496 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Historical fiction
  • ISBN: 9780007217205

£9.99

£8.65

 
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Reviews

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by
3.5

Another in the series about Victorian cad, coward, liar and lecher Flashman, of Tom Brown's Schooldays fame (or infamy). In this one Flashy is tricked, lured and/or blackmailed into joining John Brown on his famous raid on Harper's Ferry, part of the run-up to the Civil War in that part of the world.This book is as funny and cleverly put together as the others, with a lot of attention to historical detail and plausibility (and Flashman is nothing if not plausible - he spent his life practising it). However it differs from many of the others in that Flashy acts almost bravely at times, and seems to have developed a liking and respect for John Brown, whilst at the same time, of course, trying to cheat him.

Review by
3

Discovering Flashman has been my highlight for 2010. Fraser’s skills as a novelist and historian is such that he created a character who remains ultimately likeable, despite his treatment of women. There have been many such men in life – why not in art? While Flashman’s professed neutrality on the slavery ‘question’ may be difficult to swallow (at least to this modern reader), his attitude to puritans and fanatics is refreshing. Long live Flashman!