Doctor Who: Engines of War, Hardback

Doctor Who: Engines of War Hardback

3.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


"The death of billions is as nothing to us Doctor, if it helps defeat the Daleks." The Great Time War has raged for centuries, ravaging the universe.

Scores of human colony planets are now overrun by Dalek occupation forces.

A weary, angry Doctor leads a flotilla of Battle Tardises against the Dalek stronghold but in the midst of the carnage, the Doctor's Tardis crashes to a planet below: Moldox.

As the Doctor is trapped in an apocalyptic landscape, Dalek patrols roam amongst the wreckage, rounding up the remaining civilians.

But why haven't the Daleks simply killed the humans?

Searching for answers the Doctor meets 'Cinder', a young Dalek hunter.

Their struggles to discover the Dalek plan take them from the ruins of Moldox to the halls of Gallifrey, and set in motion a chain of events that will change everything. And everyone. It is an epic novel of the Great Time War featuring the War Doctor as played by John Hurt.


  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Publishing
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Science fiction
  • ISBN: 9781849908481



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

The War Doctor was an audacious solution to the problem of Christopher Eccleston’s reluctance to return to Doctor Who for the 50th anniversary special. Not only did Moffat conjure the idea of an entirely new Doctor, he found one of Britain’s finest actors to play him. Hurt delivered a fine performance, world weary but with enough spark to play the humour a Moffat script tends to demand, reminiscent in tone of Hartnell in The Three Doctors in many ways.Engines Of War is a welcome addition to this Doctor’s story, a fleshing out of a character who left me wanting to see more. It’s a story of this Doctor during wartime, with events clearly leading up to those shown in Day of the Doctor. It’s welcome that BBC Books handed the responsibility for this to George Mann, a relative newcomer in Who terms. Mann delivers a story mixing an imaginative version of the Time War (particularly in relation to the Dalek and Time Lord arms race) with a well-structured adventure yarn and captures Hurt’s performance almost perfectly. There are plenty of references to please hardcore fans but which won’t disrupt the enjoyment of newer ones, ranging from old characters to a sly reference to Rassilon’s spittle as seen in the end of time. A perfect example of modern Doctor Who books – a cracking tale of adventure and derring-do mixed with big ideas, humour and enough context to root it perfectly in its fictional universe.

Review by

"Engines of War" is the first book dealing with the Doctor his later incarnations forgot. Given that we have had even less exposure to this Doctor on screen than the Eighth Doctor I feel that it caught the nature of the Doctor's conflict as he realises that the Time War had made his people as ruthless and uncaring as the daleks they battled. A nice thing about this book is that we get to see Gallifrey once again, a sadly underused location and while we don't get a physical transformation of the Doctor we get to see some of the influences that led him to make the decision he made with the Moment in the 50th anniversary special