We Were Soldiers Once...and Young : The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam, Paperback

We Were Soldiers Once...and Young : The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam Paperback

4 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

In November 1965, 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, under the command of Lt.Col.

Hal Moore, were dropped by helicopter into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley.

They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers.

Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces.

Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War.

How these men persevered - sacrificed themselves for their comrades and never gave up - makes a vivid portrait of war at its most inspiring and devastating.

General Moore and Joseph Galloway, the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting, have interviewed hundreds of men who fought there, including the North Vietnamese commanders.

This devastating account rises above the specific ordeal it chronicles to present a picture of men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have found unimaginable only a few hours earlier.

It reveals to us, as rarely before, man's most heroic and horrendous endeavour.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 528 pages, illustrations, maps, portraits
  • Publisher: Transworld Publishers Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: True war & combat stories
  • ISBN: 9780552150262

£9.99

£8.59

 
Free Home Delivery

on all orders

 
Pick up orders

from local bookshops

Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
3

The film only showes half the story in this book those looking for balance will appreciate this book it realy does bring home the strains and stresses of war .although it is quite long it is a real page turner and one finds oneself willing the individual soldiers on hoping they make it.

Review by
5

We Were Soldiers Once And Young: Ia Drang - The Battle That Changed The War In Vietnam"We went to war because our country asked us to go,because our new President, Lyndon B. Johnson, ordered us to go,but more importantly because we saw it as our duty to go."n November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore, were dropped by helicopter into l clearing in the Ia Drang Valley.They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers.A few miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces.The conflict at the landing zones of X Ray and Albany are viewed as significant, savage and one of the most violent battles in American history.Lt Col Moore has promised his soldiers and their families"I will leave no man behind...dead or alive. We will all come home together"Detailed...realistic...valor... courage...and so much more as the brotherhood of soldiers persevered and sacrificedChronicled by retired lieutenant general Hal Moore and Joseph Galloway, the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting."A picture of men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have found unimaginable only a few hours earlier"(1992)5* for excellenceThe drama and impact of this military event far exceed any words I can lay on paper.

Review by
4

Engrossing tale of the first big battles in Vietnam fought by the 7th Calvary Division. The first was a resounding victory. The second was an inconclusive bloody draw due to mistakes by Colonel Mcdade. One grunt said my company lost 102 and they lost 104 so I guess it was a victory. It was astonishing how the North Vietnamese were able to fight toe to toe with the American Army despite the American superiority in firepower. They cleverly used the jungle and the sanctuaries in Cambodia to their advantage. General Moore who co-authored this book with journalist Galloway comes across as a brilliant military leader. As one soldier said if had not been for then Colonel Moore none of us would have survived the battles in the Ia Drang Valley. The book is enhanced by interviews with the main Vietnamese commanders faced by the Americans. During these flights they delivered much needed supplies while evacuating wounded soldiers. The fighting at Ia Drang set the tone for the conflict as American forces continued to rely on air mobility and heavy fire support to achieve victory. Conversely, the North Vietnamese learned that the latter could be neutralized by quickly closing with the enemy and fighting at close range.

Also by Harold G. Moore