Octopussy & The Living Daylights : James Bond 007, Paperback

Octopussy & The Living Daylights : James Bond 007 Paperback

1 out of 5 (1 rating)


This title comes with a new introduction by Sam Leith Octopussy.

The Property of a Lady. The Living Daylights. 007 in New York. 'This was going to be bad news, dirty work. This was to be murder'. Four classic moments in the life of a spy. From avenging the wartime murder of a friend to sniper duty on the East-West Berlin border, James Bond's body, mind and spirit are tested to their limits.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Publishing
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Espionage & spy thriller
  • ISBN: 9780099577027



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The last of Fleming’s 007 books, and that means I’ve now read the lot. I can now cross them off the list. Yay. Although, to be honest, I’m not entirely sure why I decided I had to read them all – because it turned out they were all pretty terrible. Octopussy & The Living Daylights is, as the title might suggest, a collection – and both story titles have been used for Bond movies, although the films bear zero resemblance to the source material (as usual). In ‘Octopussy’, an ex-SOE man who was a bit naughty with some gold in Italy just after the war finished is visited at his home in Jamaica by Bond. Certain hints are dropped, but the man accidentally gets stung by a stonefish while feeding it to an octopus he has sort of adopted. In ‘The Living Daylights’, Bond has been charged with killing a sniper who they’ve learnt will make an attempt on a defector who’s making a run for it from East to West Berlin. Bond has always been brutal, but this one is more brutal than most. ‘The Property of a Lady’ sees Bond trying to flush out a Soviet spy during an auction for a Fabergé globe. The last story is a squib in which Bond flies to New York, daydreams about the day ahead… only to cock up the reason he’s been sent there. Meh.

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