Ratcatcher, Paperback
5 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

A gripping historical thriller introducing Bow Street Runner Matthew Hawkwood - a sexy, dangerous and fascinating hero who hunts down thieves, spies and murderers in the crime-ridden streets of Regency London.

Hunting down highwaymen was not the usual preserve of a Bow Street Runner.

As the most resourceful of this elite band of investigators, Matthew Hawkwood was surprised to be assigned the case - even if it did involve the murder and mutilation of a naval courier.

From the squalor of St Giles Rookery, London's notorious den of thieves and cutthroats, to the brightly lit salons of the aristocracy and the heart of the British government, Hawkwood relentlessly pursues his quarry.

As the case unfolds and another body is discovered on the banks of the Thames, the true agenda begins to emerge. And only Hawkwood can stop a dastardly plot that will end British mastery of the seas forever.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 480 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Historical mysteries
  • ISBN: 9780007236459

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
5

What a jolly good romp through the underground of Regency London. This debut offers the reader a great new hero who is a bit of a different kind of character we usually see. Retiring from the army, a Captain in the Napoleonic Wars Rifle regiment, Matthew Hawkwood now works for the famous Bow Street Runners catching criminals. The reader does not encounter the wealthy ton of London, but is introduced to the seedy side of the city, complete with rapscallions, pick-pockets, wharfrats, prostitutes, mudlarks, and the entire array of anyone and everything unsavory. The book has great characters, a vivid depiction of what life was like in the late 1700's and early 1800s London and lots of action, humor, and mystery. I loved this debut and hope the author continues with the series in the same adventurous flavor. McGee's writing style could be compared to that of Bernard Cornwell, polished and engaging from start to finish. The character of Hawkwood could be compared to Clive Cussler's famous Dirk Pitt if put in a historical setting. Bravo Mr. McGee, keep 'em coming.

Review by
5

The prologue sets the dark tone for the whole book. The two highwaymen who robbed the coach killed a coachman and an officer in cold blood. One of them even cut off the officer's hand. <br/>And that is the case Matthew Hawkwood, an ex-army officer and now one of the best Bow Street Runners, is assigned to solve.<br/><br/>I loved how the hero is introduced. Two urchins pick-pocketed some officers and then ran to the place they live. Mother Gant lets them live with her as long as they bring whatever they steal. And there Matthew Hawkwood is introduced. He simply appeared at Mother Gant's door to catch a well-known fence.<br/><br/>The first time we get a glimpse of his past is not through his own reminisces, but a story told by a major Lawrence to his friend after Hawkwood returned his stolen watch and refused to admit he recognized him. <br/><br/>France and Britain are at war and everything is in its shadow. I was never interested in France that much (I don't have and reasons), so for me it was easy whose side I'm on.<br/><br/>I don't know if the author intention was to make Matthew Hawkwood really hot, but I can say he succeeded completely. Hawkwood is as real as you get. He isn't some flawless knows-it-all. He makes mistakes and he needs as much help as he can get. Nothing comes easy to him. Well, nothing except women but that isn't that important for the story. The main character could have existed for real. Some people turned out to be better friends to him than expected. <br/><br/>There are no completely black or white sides in this story (not counting individual actions, since the killings from the beginning of the book could hardly be anything other than black). And if nothing else, the ending is enough to love this book.<br/><br/>As much as I wanted to sympathize with the villain (and I did at first), because he does have valid and understandable reasons why he is doing what he is doing, by the end of the book he became a blubbering idiot, one of those <i>I am going to talk you to death about my plans</i> types. After reading tons of pages of that, he lost all the sympathy I had for him.<br/>I was more than satisfied with the ending.

Review by
5

The prologue sets the dark tone for the whole book. The two highwaymen who robbed the coach killed a coachman and an officer in cold blood. One of them even cut off the officer's hand. <br/>And that is the case Matthew Hawkwood, an ex-army officer and now one of the best Bow Street Runners, is assigned to solve.<br/><br/>I loved how the hero is introduced. Two urchins pick-pocketed some officers and then ran to the place they live. Mother Gant lets them live with her as long as they bring whatever they steal. And there Matthew Hawkwood is introduced. He simply appeared at Mother Gant's door to catch a well-known fence.<br/><br/>The first time we get a glimpse of his past is not through his own reminisces, but a story told by a major Lawrence to his friend after Hawkwood returned his stolen watch and refused to admit he recognized him. <br/><br/>France and Britain are at war and everything is in its shadow. I was never interested in France that much (I don't have and reasons), so for me it was easy whose side I'm on.<br/><br/>I don't know if the author intention was to make Matthew Hawkwood really hot, but I can say he succeeded completely. Hawkwood is as real as you get. He isn't some flawless knows-it-all. He makes mistakes and he needs as much help as he can get. Nothing comes easy to him. Well, nothing except women but that isn't that important for the story. The main character could have existed for real. Some people turned out to be better friends to him than expected. <br/><br/>There are no completely black or white sides in this story (not counting individual actions, since the killings from the beginning of the book could hardly be anything other than black). And if nothing else, the ending is enough to love this book.<br/><br/>As much as I wanted to sympathize with the villain (and I did at first), because he does have valid and understandable reasons why he is doing what he is doing, by the end of the book he became a blubbering idiot, one of those <i>I am going to talk you to death about my plans</i> types. After reading tons of pages of that, he lost all the sympathy I had for him.<br/>I was more than satisfied with the ending.

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