The Phonology of English as an International Language : New Models, New Norms, New Goals, Paperback

The Phonology of English as an International Language : New Models, New Norms, New Goals Paperback

Part of the Oxford Applied Linguistics series

4 out of 5 (1 rating)


This book advocates a new approach to pronunciation teaching, in which the goal is mutual intelligibility among non-native speakers, rather than imitating native speakers.

It will be of interest to all teachers of English as an International Language, especially Business English.

It proposes a basic core of phonological teaching, with controversial suggestions for what should be included.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 266 pages, b&w illustrations
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Applied linguistics for ELT
  • ISBN: 9780194421645



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Just as you say, Jenkins. As English goes from "second language", where the assumed purpose is to communicate with native speakers, to "English as a Lingua France", learned by a variety of people for a variety of purposes to a variety of standards it means, first: our "native-speaker" intuitions and judgments are irrelevant at best and oppressive at worst; second, that that should be reflected in a terminological shift when discussing world Englishes to "monolingual English speakers"and "bi(whu not multi)lingual English speakers", removing the implied stigma; third, that we still need to be able to understand each other,if English is not to return to the status of every other language and make this whole field of enquiry outmoded; fourth, that the main field where variation is an issue of understanding is phonology, and so--surprise! there is still a role for "our" intuitions and judgments after all.I bet in thirty years there are as many speech pathologists (gonna need a terminological shift there too . . . . ), working as accent coaches, in the "ESL" industry as there are teachers with TOEFL certificates and whatnot. I'm excited about being one of them maybe!

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