The Suicide Exhibition : The Never War, Paperback

The Suicide Exhibition : The Never War Paperback

1.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


Wewelsburg Castle, 1940. The German war machine has woken an ancient threat - the alien Vril and their Ubermensch have returned.

Ultimate Victory in the war for Europe is now within the Nazis' grasp.

England, 1941 Foreign Office trouble shooter Guy Pentecross has stumbled into a conspiracy beyond his imagining - a secret war being waged in the shadows against a terrible enemy.

The battle for Europe has just become the war for humanity.

This is The Thirty-Nine Steps crossed with Indiana Jones and Quatermass.

Justin Richards has an extremely credible grasp of the period's history and has transformed it into a groundbreaking alternate reality thriller.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Publishing
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Science fiction
  • ISBN: 9780091955977



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This was a freebie from Fantasycon, and I only picked it up after spotting the Nazi Black Sun and flying saucers on the cover. And this was despite recently reviewing Graeme Shimmin’s A Kill in the Morning, another occult Nazi alternate history, for Interzone and not being very impressed. A secret section of the British intelligence services called Station Z crops up in various places, intriguing a man and a woman who are plainly intended to be the series main protagonists. They are duly recruited and learn that Station Z is fighting against Reichsführer Himmler’s new secret occult weapon, ancient technology some of his Ahnenerbe officers have discovered in ancient barrows scattered across Europe. Unfortunately, also in said barrows are alien creatures which are, well, are completely ripped off from the hand-creatures in Alien, and some sort of alien parasite which keeps the ancient kings interred in the barrows still alive, sort of – and who promptly go on a violent rampage once released. Oh, and there are some flying saucers too, which may be linked to the ancient aliens. It’s all complete tosh, and appallingly researched. Incidentally, the title refers to an exhibition laid on in the British Museum for the duration of the war and which the Museum didn’t mind losing should the Germans bomb the crap out of the building. It’s also mentioned later as a metaphor for Station Z or something, but its presence in the story is so trivial it seems completely undeserving of providing the title. Avoid.