Crow Lake, Paperback
4.5 out of 5 (8 ratings)

Description

Crow Lake is that rare find, a first novel so quietly assured, so compelling, and with an emotional charge so perfectly controlled, that you sense at once that this is the real thing - a literary experience to relish, a book to lose yourself in, and a name to watch.

Here is a gorgeous, slowburning story of families growing up and tearing each other apart in rural Northern Ontario, where tragedy and hardship are mirrored in the landscape.

Centre stage are the Morrisons whose tragedy is insidious and divisive. Orphaned young, Kate Morrison was her older brother Matt's protegee, her curious fascination for pond-life fed by his passionate interest in the natural world.

Now a zoologist, she can identify organisms under a microscope, but seems blind to the tragedy of her own emotional life.

She thinks she's outgrown her family, who were once her entire world - but she can't seem to outgrow her childhood or lighten the weight of their mutual past.

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 8 reviews.

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Review by
5

Subtly strong - I always find myself coming back to it to remind me of what's important.

Review by
5

Luke, Matt, Kat and Bo, small town Ontario

Review by
5

Kate, Matt, Bo and Luke. Family tragedy in North Ontario. Loved it second time around as much.

Review by
4.5

This is a decent story, simply but elegantly told, about family and loss and sacrifice and mistakes that change lives. You could learn a lot about pond life by reading it, too, if you were so inclined. I liked the gentle humour, particularly the scene in the restaurant with the boyfriend's parents. Left me hoping the writer would produce more books.

Review by
4.5

I liked this book very much. I think Mary Lawson is quite perceptive about the relationships between people, especially within families. Certainly her story struck a chord with me at a deep emotional level, and I shed tears in places which were not especially overtly sad. This is very much a story about regrets, disappointments, and unfulfilled dreams. I had perhaps forgotten how important those things were in my life.

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