Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend, Paperback Book
4 out of 5 (9 ratings)

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Goodreads finalist 2012 as voted by over 1 million readers My name is BUDO. I have been alive for 5 years. 5 years is a very long time for someone like me to be alive. MAX gave me my name. Max is 8 years old. He is the only human person who can see me. I know what Max knows, and some things he doesn't. I know that Max is in danger. And I know that I am the only one who can save him.

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Showing 1 - 5 of 9 reviews.

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Review by
4.5

This is a great read. If you liked The curious incident of the dog in the night time you might like this one.especially if you have ever had an imaginary friend. It is told from the point of view of eight year old autistic Max Delaney's imaginary friend Budo. Budo looks just as Max imagined him to, and can do only what Max imagined he could do. He lives in the world of imaginary friends and meets and talks with other imaginary friends of differing sizes and appearances. He goes with Max wherever he goes as Max needs him there except one day Max goes missing. After a time Budo finds out what has happened to him but how can he save him. He cannot do it by himself but where will he finid help. Or can Max save himself when he needs to. This book really captured by imagination. What a wonderful story- moving with real characters.

Review by
3.5

A delightfully imaginative story about Budo, who is the imaginary friend of an 8 year old boy named Max. Budo has been alive for 5 years, which is a long time for an imaginary friend. Reading between the lines of what Budo says, Max is probably autistic. Budo has a delightful voice, and is very perceptive in many of his comments about how Max interacts with the people in his world. I liked his observations on what makes a good teacher and what makes a bad teacher, for example. Budo is conscious that his own life span is likely to be limited, as imaginary friends only exist for as long as children believe in them. But he’s the only one who knows that Max is in danger. This was written very accessibly, from Budo’s child-like point of view, and yet was very rich, and didn’t shy away from playing with big ideas about life and death, courage, loyalty and sacrifice.

Review by
3.5

Too repetitive.I was surprised to find that the author wrote this book for an adult audience, and although I realise that the narrative voice was only nine years old, I found the simplistic style too much. The repetition of Budo's fears of 'disappearing' became tedious in the extreme and the reference to the 'pooping on the head' incident, frankly, irritating.Budo is Max's Imaginary Friend. He has been an Imaginary Friend now for five years, an incredibly long time for an Imaginary Friend to survive. This may be due to the fact that Max appears to be autistic and can relate to Budo but not to the other children and adults who surround him. He needs Budo to help him navigate the outside world. Max is a highly intelligent child and as a result, Budo is also intelligent. Max has not imagined him needing to sleep, so Budo stays up all night with Max's parents, or visiting within a limited range of Max's house. Other Imaginary Friends exist and Budo can talk with them, but for the most part they are short lived and less developed than Budo.This scene-setting part of the novel was an interesting view into the life of an autistic boy and his life in school. His interactions with his parents, teachers and fellow students were fascinating.Then the novel took on a more thrilleresque nature and became more unbelievable. As another reviewer noted, it felt like a copy from a similar, recently popular book. This, added to my growing annoyance with the repetitions noted in my opening comments, made the book a struggle to complete.My book group gave it 4 stars, but I was less keen, 3 (3 1/2) stars for me. However, in preparation for the meeting, I read a few interviews with the author and I would be happy to try one of his other books at some time.

Review by
5

Loved this book from start to finish! Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend was different from any book I've ever read before, although the overall "voice" or feel of the book was similar to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, which is an all-time favorite of mine. Budo, the imaginary friend created by young Max, pulled me into the story from page one. As the narrator, Budo held my interest, made me laugh, and kept me guessing all the way to the fabulous end. I smiled and nodded my head as he described his human friend Max's unique personality. Max lives with an unnamed diagnosis (my conclusion was high-functioning autism or Aspergers). Budo's perspective allows him a fascinating insight to Max that others don't have -- if you have a friend or family member with a similar diagnosis, Budo may give you a glimpse into their world. At any rate, Memoirs is well-written and was a real joy to read. It was thoughtful, humorous, and suspenseful. I will be checking out more titles from this author!Please note that while I did receive a complimentary advance copy of this book, it did not influence my review. Thank you.

Review by
5

Budo is the imaginary friend of Max, a bright but severely introverted eight year old boy with many fears and who hates change. Max has depended on Budo to get him through each day for the last five years - five years is long time for an imaginary friend to exist.Budo knows everything about Max, and he also knows that he will continue to exist only as long as Max needs him. So when he realises that Max is in danger Budo knows that he is the only one who can save him, but he is torn between what to do and whose interests should come first, his or Max's. Budo provides his own account of life with Max, and of the drama that is about to unfold. So the novel is written in the words of the imaginary friend of an eight year old boy, a boy who knows only what Max knows along with what he himself has learnt. As such it is charmingly expressed in a mixture of naivety and the wisdom of the creation of an intelligent eight year old boy. Over the course of events Budo is faced with the questions of friendship, love, loyalty and self-sacrifice. Memoirs of an Imaginary Friends is a delightful read, heart warming, moving and heart-rending.

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