The Meaning of Night, Paperback
3.5 out of 5 (7 ratings)

Description

A cold October night, 1854. In a dark passageway, an innocent man is stabbed to death.

So begins the extraordinary story of Edward Glyver, book lover, scholar and murderer.

As a young boy, Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness.

This seems the stuff of dreams, until a chance discovery convinces Glyver that he was right: greatness does await him, along with immense wealth and influence. And he will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he now knows is rightfully his.

Glyver's path leads him from the depths of Victorian London, with its foggy streets, brothels and opium dens, to Evenwood, one of England's most enchanting country houses.

His is a story of betrayal and treachery, of death and delusion, of ruthless obsession and ambition. And at every turn, driving Glyver irresistibly onwards, is his deadly rival: the poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt.

Thirty years in the writing, The Meaning of Night is a stunning achievement.

Full of drama and passion, it is an enthralling novel that will captivate readers right up to its final thrilling revelation.

Information

£9.99

£8.95

 
Free Home Delivery

on all orders

 
Pick up orders

from local bookshops

Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 7 reviews.

  Previous  |  Next

Review by
3.5

A very tough book to read. It is full of details. After I read that it took the author 30 years to complete this book, I was afraid that it would take me as long to finish it. Because finish it, I wanted to. The story is cleverly written and the ending is completely unexpected...or maybe not.

Review by
5

Great book, I finished reading it only the day before. Cleverly written, well researched, interesting plot, atmospheric and somehow real. Edward G. lost it all but got his revenge. I really enjoyed every minute of reading it. The details just got me (Tredgold's hobby, Dr. Daunt, Edward's Mum).

Review by
4

This is a book about Victorian London, about stolen identities, about smog, about the Victorian obsession with antiquarian books, about opium addiction, about madness and about the dichotomy between the rich and poor, East and West London. Sound familiar? Yes, it's very Dickens, very Wilkie Collins. The difference is that this was written last year. Cox has conjured up the language and the atmosphere of a Dickensian epic, his characterisation and intrigues all reflect the writer he obviously emulates. The book is maybe a little long (as most of Dickens' were) and probably would have worked well in the serialisation format of Victorian London (and how cool would that have been -- people should start publishing like that again), and all the characters come together at the end. Cox is a scholar and editor of Victorian ghost stories. He has obviously picked up a lot of tips and has used them all here. That said The Meaning of Night is still an excellent book. It's gripping and well written and highly recommended. There is after all nothing wrong with emulating one of the best!

Review by
4

A pastiche of all that's good about Victorian literature, The Meaning of Night is admittedly overly long and repetetive, but the plot is full enough of intrigue and betrayal, love, sex, crime and revenge to make that wading through words feeling not matter so much.

Review by
3

From Fantastic fiction.This work is set in a cold October night, 1854. In a dark passageway, an innocent man is stabbed to death. So begins the extraordinary story of Edward Glyver, booklover, scholar and murderer. As a young boy, Glyver always believed he was destined for greatness. This seems the stuff of dreams, until a chance discovery convinces Glyver that he was right: greatness does await him, along with immense wealth and influence. And he will stop at nothing to win back a prize that he now knows is rightfully his. Glyver's path leads him from the depths of Victorian London, with its foggy streets, brothels and opium dens, to Evenwood, one of England's most enchanting country houses. His is a story of betrayal and treachery, of death and delusion, of ruthless obsession and ambition. And at every turn, driving Glyver irresistibly onwards, is his deadly rival: the poet-criminal Phoebus Rainsford Daunt.Wow, by the time I had finished this book I felt I had been pulled through a hedge backwards. It was on overlong book which could have had the same effect being 200 pages shorter. The book is very descriptive and very wordy. Towards the end I felt I was getting very bored but needed to carry on to find out the outcome. Full of twists and turns that does keep up the pace of the story but too long winded. Edward I felt was like a dog with a bone and wouldn’t let go no matter what it took. Emily I could have slapped when it was revealed what she was up to. Phoebus I felt was a victim but became a criminal to hold onto what he had gained.Would I recommend this book, well yes but be prepared for a long read.

  Previous  |  Next