A Dead Man's Memoir : A Theatrical Novel, Paperback
3.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)

Description

This is Bulgakov's semi-autobiographical story of a writer who fails to sell his novel and fails to commit suicide.

When his play is taken up by the theatre, literary success beckons, but he has reckoned without the grotesquely inflated egos of the actors, directors and theatre managers.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Classic fiction (pre c 1945)
  • ISBN: 9780140455144

£10.99

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by
3.5

It is not only a reflection on me that I managed to read 30 or 40 pages of this book before realizing that I had read it before, more than fifteen years ago, translated under the title Black Snow. It is inconceivable that something similar could happen with even the first two paragraphs – or even two paragraphs chosen at random – from The Master & Margarita or The Heart of the Dog. Thus my thrill at discovering what I thought was a Bulgakov work newly translated into English dissolved into disappointment.I am sure that this was once a very good novel, but it is too grounded in its own time and place to be of overpowering excitement today. This unfinished novel is a roman à clef of a Bulgakov figure selling his first novel and then attempting to get a theatrical version of it produced. He runs into a number of obstacles, some of them quite amusing, many of them routed in the neuroses of the Stanislavski figure in the novel. Although funny and interesting at times, it is packed with characters standing in for real Russian theatrical figures in the 1930s, and ultimately falls under the weight of all of them.

Review by
3

It is not only a reflection on me that I managed to read 30 or 40 pages of this book before realizing that I had read it before, more than fifteen years ago, translated under the title Black Snow. It is inconceivable that something similar could happen with even the first two paragraphs

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