The Ghost Hunters, Paperback
2.5 out of 5 (7 ratings)

Description

Now a major ITV drama starring Rafe Spall and Cara Theobold.

A hair-raising fictionalized account of the Borley Rectory haunting, based on contemporary first-hand testimonies. Welcome to Borley Rectory, the most haunted house in England.

The year is 1926 and Sarah Grey has landed herself an unlikely new job - personal assistant to Harry Price, London's most infamous ghost hunter.

Equal parts brilliant and charming, neurotic and manipulative, Harry has devoted his life to exposing the truth behind England's many 'false hauntings', and never has he left a case unsolved, nor a fraud unexposed.

So when Harry and Sarah are invited to Borley Rectory - a house so haunted that objects frequently fly through the air unbidden, and locals avoid the grounds for fear of facing the spectral nun that walks there - they're sure that this case will be just like any other.

But when night falls and still no artifice can be found, the ghost hunters are forced to confront an uncomfortable possibility: the ghost of Borley Rectory may be real. And, if so, they're about to make its most intimate acquaintance.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Quercus Publishing
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Historical mysteries
  • ISBN: 9781780879758

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 7 reviews.

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Review by
3.5

This is a very slow burner. It doesn't really capture a great creepy atmosphere. Sarah only feels chills across her arms but nothing else when faced with evil forces. It's a good book but not a great one. It was predictable about the boy and we'd heard enough about Harry to not be particurarily shocked about his character. Why she ended up with Wall is a mystery in itself! The weirdness of Borley Rectory is never explained. The nun, yes to a degree. Carlos?yes but the headless coachmen and mysterious lights?no.

Review by
3

A good, if somewhat meandering account of fictionalised ghost hunter Harry Price & his involvement with the Borley Rectory, allegedly the most haunted House in England. Whilst the plot was involved & complex, it did take some time to move & pacing was an issue here. The setting in the spiritualist & medium world of post World War One Britain, was quite well handled. Truly a tragic tale, but at times involving. Rewarding but at times hard work.

Review by
3
2.5
This is a hard book to rate. I almost left it unread more than once (I never do that), especially the first third. Note to future readers: this is not a horror story. If you expect a horror story, you will be disappointed. I have to stop paying attention to labels.
This is historical fiction, a well researched story. Its focus are Borley Rectory, allegedly the most haunted house in England, Harry Price and his fictional assistant Sarah Grey.

It is hard to enjoy a book with characters as either despicable, infuriating or boring as these. I mean all of them. Their relationships are just presented to the reader. They are unexplained. Most of the time you will not see the connection beyond what you are told about them. Usually in books when you come upon something you don't agree with, that doesn't mean it isn't well presented and explained in a book. You don't even have to accept it to understand it. Here, that is not the case. Here, I spent most of my time gritting my teeth whenever characters' feelings were in the focus. Let's just say various relationships in this book are not its greatest strength.

Sarah Grey narrates the story how she became Price's assistant, their various investigations, how Borley Rectory left its mark on them. That is the main story. However, the author tries to go deeper but, as I said, a relationships of any kind are not really good. Maybe that is the reason why I hated all the characters: weak Sarah, devious Price, too ambitious Wall, selfish mother, etc. None of them are even remotely likeable.

Regarding ghosts, in the end you are free to think whatever you want, to accept the hauntings as true or not. The way this book is written, both are acceptable. I think this is this book's greatest strength. I would have enjoyed it more if I hadn't been expecting a horror story. The most important thing is to start reading this knowing this is closer to historical fiction than horror.
The best part? I loved the way the letters, extracts from journals, newspapers articles and various other documents are used to tell this story.
Review by
2

I read a lot of ghost stories. I write them, too. Perhaps this makes me harder to impress. I don't know.<br/><br/>All I know is the The Ghost Hunters was a disappointment. <br/><br/>It could have lost 100 pages, easily, without damaging the story at all. 150 pagews gone might have improved it. I understand that Spring was trying to capture the more formal style of writing and speaking common in the 20's, but it ended coming across as unbelievable and contrived.<br/><br/>Any spooky and scary moments were sadly lost among interminable waffle. We were at page 190 before anything even vaguely related to the story I was promised showed up. If that time had been spent on the later creepiness with the dark women and the curse, it would have been a much better book.<br/><br/>I didn't like Sarah. I didn't believe her. She didn't seem real. Her whole life was subsumed by this unpleasant man and despite how hard other characters tried to impress me with her intelligence she seemed willfully ignorant and stupid. Despite being the protagonist she did very little, and had to be told the truth by another man.<br/><br/>The reveal, that she <spoiler> got pregnant, and the baby was the man who found her narrative</spoiler> was so obvious it made me roll my eyes.<br/><br/>Good potential, sadly wasted.

Review by
2

I read a lot of ghost stories. I write them, too. Perhaps this makes me harder to impress. I don't know.<br/><br/>All I know is the The Ghost Hunters was a disappointment. <br/><br/>It could have lost 100 pages, easily, without damaging the story at all. 150 pagews gone might have improved it. I understand that Spring was trying to capture the more formal style of writing and speaking common in the 20's, but it ended coming across as unbelievable and contrived.<br/><br/>Any spooky and scary moments were sadly lost among interminable waffle. We were at page 190 before anything even vaguely related to the story I was promised showed up. If that time had been spent on the later creepiness with the dark women and the curse, it would have been a much better book.<br/><br/>I didn't like Sarah. I didn't believe her. She didn't seem real. Her whole life was subsumed by this unpleasant man and despite how hard other characters tried to impress me with her intelligence she seemed willfully ignorant and stupid. Despite being the protagonist she did very little, and had to be told the truth by another man.<br/><br/>The reveal, that she <spoiler> got pregnant, and the baby was the man who found her narrative</spoiler> was so obvious it made me roll my eyes.<br/><br/>Good potential, sadly wasted.

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