The Inimitable Jeeves : (Jeeves & Wooster), Paperback

The Inimitable Jeeves : (Jeeves & Wooster) Paperback

Part of the Jeeves & Wooster series

4.5 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

A Jeeves and Wooster collection A classic collection of stories featuring some of the funniest episodes in the life of Bertie Wooster, gentleman, and Jeeves, his gentleman's gentleman - in which Bertie's terrifying Aunt Agatha stalks the pages, seeking whom she may devour, while Bertie's friend Bingo Little falls in love with seven different girls in succession (including the bestselling romantic novelist Rosie M.

Banks). And Bertie, with Jeeves's help, hopes to evade the clutches of the terrifying Honoria Glossop...At its heart is one of Wodehouse's most delicious stories, 'The Great Sermon Handicap.'

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Cornerstone
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Classic fiction (pre c 1945)
  • ISBN: 9780099513681

£8.99

£6.65

 
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Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
4

This book is a collection of stories revolving around Bertie Wooster and the mishaps that happen in his life. I have previously watched and enjoyed the television series starring Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry and felt obliged to read at least one of the books that Jeeves and Wooster is based on.<br/><br/> The plot was interesting throughout as the chapters were each separate stories but continued on from each other so you could easily read this in one session. It is only 253 pages long so I managed to read this in a day and was drawn in by the various events that take place.<br/><br/> The characters were my favourite part of this book. Wooster, the protagonist, was a bit annoying to be honest, mostly because he seemed to just go along with everything that he was told, but Jeeves was definitely intriguing and held the reader's interest. I found him mysterious and funny in parts and felt that he interacted well with all of the side characters and added a lot to the development of the characters and plots.<br/><br/> This book was originally published in 1923 and this is evident by the type of language that is used throughout. I found it difficult to get used to but got into it eventually and couldn't put it down! The individual stories tied together really well but I feel they could also be read separately.<br/><br/> Overall I would give this book 4 out of 5 stars as I found the writing style difficult in parts and it was not as funny as I thought it would be, but this was an enjoyable read and I will definitely pick up some of the others in this series at some point.

Review by
5

Bertie Wooster and his manservant, Jeeves, embark on many adventures involving family and friends. Its guaranteed that hilarity will ensue. While Bertie is enmeshed in some crazy scheme, Jeeves undoubtedly will go behind the scenes to save the day. One never knows what sort of silly situation Bertie or his friends will end up in.<br/><br/>Well-off Bertie is not exactly like anyone I’ve ever known. I did know a man who didn’t bother working as he had enough money to live on but he had a rather more modern lifestyle than Bertie does. After all, these stories were published around 1920.<br/><br/>There is no comparison with the jaunty, succinct exchanges between Bertie and Jeeves. They are hilarious in that they convey so much with so few words.<br/><br/> <blockquote>‘Steggles is a bad man. From now on, Jeeves, we must watch Harold like hawks.’<br/> ‘Undoubtedly, sir.’<br/> ‘Ceaseless vigilance, what?’<br/> ‘Precisely, sir.’<br/> ‘You wouldn’t care to sleep in his room, Jeeves?’<br/> ‘No, sir, I should not.’<br/> ‘No, nor would I, if it comes to that. But dash it all,’ I said, ‘we’re letting ourselves get rattled! We’re losing our nerve. This won’t do. How can Steggles possibly get at Harold, even if he wants to?’<br/> There was no cheering young Bingo up. He’s one of those birds who simply leap at the morbid view, if you give them half a chance.<br/> ‘There are all sorts of ways of nobbling favourites,’ he said, in a sort of death-bed voice. ‘You ought to read some of these racing novels. In <i>Pipped on the Post</i>, Lord Jasper Mauleverer as near as a toucher outed Bonny Betsy by bribing the head lad to slip a cobra into her stable the night before the Derby!’<br/> ‘What are the chances of a cobra biting Harold, Jeeves?’<br/> ‘Slight, I should imagine, sir. And in such an event, knowing the boy as intimately as I do, my anxiety would be entirely for the snake.’<br/> ‘Still, unceasing vigilance, Jeeves.’<br/> ‘Most certainly, sir.’</blockquote><br/><br/>My favorite story in this collection is <i><b>The Metropolitan Touch</b></i>. Bertie’s friend Bingo Little thinks he’s in love and will do just about anything to make himself look worthy to the young lady of his affection. This includes taking over the directing of a Christmas play in a rural community. Of course he has no experience at directing plays. Absolutely brilliant! I seriously laughed out loud throughout the performance part.<br/><br/>Even though Jeeves always saves the day, my favorite character is Bertie. I love his exasperation and his chirpy colloquialisms. “What the deuce?” “a corking reward,” and “it will be a frost” are just three examples.<br/><br/>I’ve previously read <i><b>Jeeves in the Morning</b></i> and <i><b>Carry On, Jeeves</b></i> and while I love them both, I think I love this book even more! Do read this book if you enjoy old-style British humor.

Review by
5

Bertie Wooster and his manservant, Jeeves, embark on many adventures involving family and friends. Its guaranteed that hilarity will ensue. While Bertie is enmeshed in some crazy scheme, Jeeves undoubtedly will go behind the scenes to save the day. One never knows what sort of silly situation Bertie or his friends will end up in.<br/><br/>Well-off Bertie is not exactly like anyone I’ve ever known. I did know a man who didn’t bother working as he had enough money to live on but he had a rather more modern lifestyle than Bertie does. After all, these stories were published around 1920.<br/><br/>There is no comparison with the jaunty, succinct exchanges between Bertie and Jeeves. They are hilarious in that they convey so much with so few words.<br/><br/> <blockquote>‘Steggles is a bad man. From now on, Jeeves, we must watch Harold like hawks.’<br/> ‘Undoubtedly, sir.’<br/> ‘Ceaseless vigilance, what?’<br/> ‘Precisely, sir.’<br/> ‘You wouldn’t care to sleep in his room, Jeeves?’<br/> ‘No, sir, I should not.’<br/> ‘No, nor would I, if it comes to that. But dash it all,’ I said, ‘we’re letting ourselves get rattled! We’re losing our nerve. This won’t do. How can Steggles possibly get at Harold, even if he wants to?’<br/> There was no cheering young Bingo up. He’s one of those birds who simply leap at the morbid view, if you give them half a chance.<br/> ‘There are all sorts of ways of nobbling favourites,’ he said, in a sort of death-bed voice. ‘You ought to read some of these racing novels. In <i>Pipped on the Post</i>, Lord Jasper Mauleverer as near as a toucher outed Bonny Betsy by bribing the head lad to slip a cobra into her stable the night before the Derby!’<br/> ‘What are the chances of a cobra biting Harold, Jeeves?’<br/> ‘Slight, I should imagine, sir. And in such an event, knowing the boy as intimately as I do, my anxiety would be entirely for the snake.’<br/> ‘Still, unceasing vigilance, Jeeves.’<br/> ‘Most certainly, sir.’</blockquote><br/><br/>My favorite story in this collection is <i><b>The Metropolitan Touch</b></i>. Bertie’s friend Bingo Little thinks he’s in love and will do just about anything to make himself look worthy to the young lady of his affection. This includes taking over the directing of a Christmas play in a rural community. Of course he has no experience at directing plays. Absolutely brilliant! I seriously laughed out loud throughout the performance part.<br/><br/>Even though Jeeves always saves the day, my favorite character is Bertie. I love his exasperation and his chirpy colloquialisms. “What the deuce?” “a corking reward,” and “it will be a frost” are just three examples.<br/><br/>I’ve previously read <i><b>Jeeves in the Morning</b></i> and <i><b>Carry On, Jeeves</b></i> and while I love them both, I think I love this book even more! Do read this book if you enjoy old-style British humor.

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