Phonetic Data Analysis : An Introduction to Fieldwork and Instrumental Techniques, Paperback Book

Phonetic Data Analysis : An Introduction to Fieldwork and Instrumental Techniques Paperback

3.5 out of 5 (1 rating)

Description

Phonetic Data Analysis examines the procedures involved in describing the sounds of a language and illustrates the basic techniques of experimental phonetics, most of them requiring little more than a tape recorder, a video camera, and a computer. * Examines the procedures involved in describing the sounds of a language and illustrates the basic techniques of experimental phonetics. * Written by Peter Ladefoged, one of the world's leading phoneticians. * Enables readers to work with a speaker in class or go out into the field and make their own discoveries about how the sounds of a language are made. * Provides full descriptions of techniques that are readily available and do not require the resources of a major phonetics laboratory. * Includes enlightening comments throughout about Ladefoged's own fieldwork experiences.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 208 pages, 94 illustrations
  • Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Phonetics, phonology
  • ISBN: 9780631232704

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3.5

This is such a good idea, this kind of "forget the theory, here's what you'll actually do. Here's what I know about reading a spectrogram. Here's what I know about fixing the equipment. Take bug spray"-style hot tips approach to a discipline. And Ladefoged is certainly the man to pull it off if anyone can--although I'm not sure if he totally does. The thing with the equipment is it changes so fast, and while the people who are actually parachuting into the Amazon to front-line record new-discovered language isolates can no doubt learn something from this, the students who are going to be reading this book need to work up to it some. That sounds like I'm saying it was too advanced, and I'm not--I'm saying more to the point would have been "here are some easy experiments that you can do with your friends to get practice reading a spectrograph. Here are some you can do with an airflow meter." Because these people, phonetics profs, from what I've seen they love telling us some stuff about sounds and some stuff about their research and then leaving us to figure out all the practicalities ourselves. I could have used some more practice reading spectral slices and nomograms and many other things, and it's a bit of an abdication of responsibility to just go over it in class once and then say "now study on your own time." But there i a wealth of good random tidbits in here, and Ladefoged is an engaging narrator.