The Fabric of Sin : A Merrily Watkins Mystery, Paperback

The Fabric of Sin : A Merrily Watkins Mystery Paperback

5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


NOW A MAJOR ITV DRAMA The Master House, close to the Welsh border, is medieval and slowly falling into ruins.

Now the house and its surrounding land have been sold to the Duchy of Cornwall.

But the Duchy's plans to renovate the house and its outbuildings are frustrated when the specialist builder refuses to work there. 'This is a place,' he tells the Prince's land-steward, 'that doesn't want to be restored.' Directed by the Bishop of Hereford to investigate, deliverance consultant Merrily Watkins discovers ancient connections between the house and the nearby church, built by the Knights Templar whose shadow still envelopes isolated Garway Hill and its scattered communities.

Why did all the local inns have astrological names? What deep history lies behind the vicious feud between two local families? And what happened here to intimidate even the great Edwardian ghost-story writer M R James?

When Merrily learns that she - and even her daughter, Jane - are under surveillance by the security services, she's ready to quit. But a sudden death changes everything, and she returns to Garway to uncover fibres of fear and hatred stitched into history and now insidiously twisted in the corridors - and the cloisters - of power.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Quercus Publishing
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9781847243959



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

Following the recent publication of the eleventh book in the series I've decided to reread the series. The Duchy of Cornwall calls Merrily in to investigate and mediate when their builder walks off a restoration project. Merrily is shocked when she seems to feel an evil presence in the house and, in preparation for a blessing, tries to find the source of the feeling, is this an ancient evil or is its source more modern? I love how Rickman blends ancient and modern history in this story, bringing in the Knights Templar and hippie drop out communes from the 1960s. Superb.

Review by

Phil Rickman's Merrily Watkins series keeps getting better and better. In this book we delve into the past (during the 13 and 14 centuries) when the Knights Templar still existed. I like the way that Rickman examines the history of this very interesting time. He links this with Merrily's efforts to bless a house that Merrily knows has very evil prescences in it. The only thing that she's not sure is whether or not the evil dates back that far, or is it perhaps more recent than that? I am terribly interested in the Knights Templar and in the era so this made the book even more fun for me. Another thing that I really noticed, Rickman's characters have grown and changed since the beginning of the series. I can't believe how real they seem! Merrily finds herself in an ancient secret that still seems to have modern-day people protecting it in this wonderful book. Can't wait for the next one which happens to be the last one in the series so far. Hope Phil Rickman is going to write more Merrily Watkins stories.

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