The Red Queen, Paperback Book
3.5 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

The second book in Philippa's stunning new trilogy, The Cousins War, brings to life the story of Margaret Beaufort, a shadowy and mysterious character in the first book of the series - The White Queen - but who now takes centre stage in the bitter struggle of The War of the Roses.

The Red Queentells the story of the child-bride of Edmund Tudor, who, although widowed in her early teens, uses her determination of character and wily plotting to infiltrate the house of York under the guise of loyal friend and servant, undermine the support for Richard III and ultimately ensure that her only son, Henry Tudor, triumphs as King of England.

Through collaboration with the dowager Queen Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret agrees a betrothal between Henry and Elizabeth's daughter, thereby uniting the families and resolving the Cousins War once and for all by founding of the Tudor dynasty.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 432 pages, 1 Illustrations
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Historical fiction
  • ISBN: 9781847394651

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
5

I enjoyed this book a lot more than I did 'The White Queen' although, as others have mentioned, the protagonist is not a nice person and does not seem to improve herself at all during the course of the novel. This is the story of Margaret Beaufort, the mother of Henry VII, and how she fought throughout her life to bring him to the throne of England - a very interesting story and one which, thanks to Margaret's hubris, is filled with moments of great humour.

Review by
2
The second book in Philippa's stunning new trilogy, The Cousins War, brings to life the story of Margaret Beaufort, a shadowy and mysterious character in the first book of the series - The White Queen - but who now takes centre stage in the bitter struggle of The War of the Roses.

The Red Queen tells the story of the child-bride of Edmund Tudor, who, although widowed in her early teens, uses her determination of character and wily plotting to infiltrate the house of York under the guise of loyal friend and servant, undermine the support for Richard III and ultimately ensure that her only son, Henry Tudor, triumphs as King of England. Through collaboration with the dowager Queen Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret agrees a betrothal between Henry and Elizabeth's daughter, thereby uniting the families and resolving the Cousins War once and for all by founding of the Tudor dynasty.



I get that Philipa Gregory is telling the story of the cousins’ war from different viewpoints and that fine is until you have to tell the story of the most boring, deluded, egotistical female character...ever

The White Queen was good mainly because Elizabeth Woodville was such a charismatic character and her story was well told. I do admit to almost enjoying the first quarter of The Red Queen with Jasper Tudor and the future king but then, for me, it went rapidly downhill.

I was listening to it on audio book but think I would have given up pretty early on if I had been reading it.

Every incident was either "The Will of God" (good for Margaret) or "The Work of the Devil" (bad for Margaret) …interspersed with lots of praying, and non-stop whining about destiny

Disappointing and TOO MUCH PRAYING….
Review by
4

Oh this was so much better than The White Queen! I still find the whole Plantagenet/War of the Roses thing confusing: so many dukes and princes with the same name, but this time it made more sense, maybe because I've a better understanding of the Tudors or maybe constant consultation of my trusty book on The King &amp; Queens of England by ER Delderfield has finally done the trick. Either way, this made more sense and, thankfully, did not contain all the stupid witchcraft of The White Queen.<br/><br/>So this one centres on Margaret Beaufort, descendent of John of Gaunt and heir to the House of Lancaster. At a jaw droppingly early age, she is married to Edmund Tudor (who also has a claim to the throne) to cement their prospects. By the age of 13 she is a widow and pregnant. The child she bore would one day be Henry VI. The book covers her scheming and plotting to ensure that her son survives and makes it to the throne. <br/><br/>She is portrayed as a very pious and devout woman and historical works all seem to agree with this. She's also portrayed as an unpleasant, cold and scheming woman whose sole existance centred on plotting regardless of the safety of those around her. Who can say if this is true or not.<br/><br/>Regardless, this is a return to form for the author as far as I'm concerned. I'll probably give The Lady of the Rivers a miss as it, undoubtably, will be based around the witchcraft allegations again, but The Kingmakers Daughter may well find its way onto Mount TBR in the future.<br/>

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