Republic, Paperback
4.5 out of 5 (4 ratings)


The revised edition of Grube's classic translation follows and furthers Grube's noted success in combining fidelity to Platos text with natural readability, while reflecting the fruits of new scholarship and insights into Plato's thought since publication of the first edition in 1974.

A new introduction, index, and bibliography by Professor Reeve are included in this new rendering.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Hackett Publishing Co, Inc
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Literary essays
  • ISBN: 9780872201361


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Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by

Plato's <i> The Republic</i> is a staple in philosophical literature. The Allegory of the Cave, the story of a man finally reaching his enlightenment but wanting to return to the cave (or ignorance), has been exemplified in recent years: people remain ignorant of certain facts, and when confronted with them, they continue to enjoy the cave. This is not a very comforting thought.

Review by

butter than I expected. and a bit shocking...but I think most of those go to cultural differences and do NOTHING to expunge him as one of the world's first philosopher.

Review by

This famous piece of literature introduces readers to the Socratic method. Socrates was a famous Greek philosopher and his student Plato wrote about his method of teaching. Instead of informing or explaining things, Socrates would ask questions and open a dialogue with his students. He shared his philosophical view by asking questions and making his students reach the conclusions on their own. His political theories and observations are still relevant, though the book was written in 300 BC. In The Republic Socrates discusses the way to create a perfect society. They work their way through the different rules and regulations that society would need. They decide what their education would focus on and whether there would be equality between the sexes, etc. As they talk through all of the details of their society they come to the inevitable conclusion that it can never exist. Mankind is too flawed and even with the best of intentions, political leaders are corrupted by power. The other major issue up for debate is justice. Each man comes to the table with a slightly different view of how to define justice. Is justice helping your friends? Is it unjust to injure your enemies? These questions make the Athenians go round and round as they each add their opinions to the mix. This book also includes the famous allegory of the cave, which is discussed in every Philosophy 101 class. BOTTOM LINE: The arguments aren’t flawless, but it’s the style of arguing that makes this such a compelling read. I enjoyed every second of it and would highly recommend finding an audio version if you can.“The society we have described can never grow into a reality or see the light of day, and there will be no end to the troubles of states, or indeed, my dear Glaucon, of humanity itself, till philosophers become rulers in this world, or till those we now call kings and rulers really and truly become philosophers, and political power and philosophy thus come into the same hands.”“They agreed to avoid doing injustice in order to avoid suffering it. This is the origin of laws and contracts.”“Don’t you think this is why education in the arts is so powerful? Rhythm and harmony find their way to the inner part of the soul and establish themselves there, bringing grace to the well-educated.” 

Review by

The best thing about this particular edition is the excellent indexing of terms in the back.