Quicksilver, Paperback
4 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

Once I was a girl who was special. Now I am extraordinary. And they will never stop hunting me. The compelling follow-up to the bestselling ULTRAVIOLET, this psychological thriller will take your breath away...

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Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
4
Quicksilver is the sequel to Ultraviolet, a story about Alison who is admitted to a psych ward after a breakdown. It is not initially clear whether Ultraviolet is a murder mystery, a thriller, a supernatural tale, or simply a story about a teenage psychiatric facility - and I loved that. So I'm going to review Quicksilver without spoiling Ultraviolet... but if you're going to read Quicksilver, read Ultraviolet first. It's worth it.Quicksilver is not about Alison, but another character from Ultraviolet. "Niki" is on the run. She and her family leave town, change their names, start over somewhere new. It's an opportunity for Niki to reinvent herself.Then her past catches up with her, and she has to use all of her inexplicably exceptional engineering ability to protect herself and those she cares about.However, her biggest challenge is trusting a new friend enough to tell him her secrets.Quicksilver is a compelling, can't-stop-reading thriller. It is about identity, and trust and friendship, and it asks something which doesn't get asked enough: namely, why should friendship be seen as less important than other kinds of relationships?And, like Ultraviolet, it's about a teenage girl who wants to be free to live her life and accepted for who she is. I loved this. I loved that Niki is different from other YA heroines (I want more protagonists like this, please). I enjoyed seeing Ultraviolet characters from "Niki's" perspective, and to have some of my questions about what happened next answered.There’s something exciting about reinventing yourself, even if it means leaving all your friends and the only life you’ve ever known behind.My only fear was that I might not have made myself different enough.
Review by
4

Though I did not love Ultraviolet quite so much as I had hoped, I was still curious enough to break my NetGalley embargo to run out and request Quicksilver. I mean, why wait until freaking May if I did not have to, right? Thankfully, I was approved, and I got to reading pretty promptly, because of my resolution to do better about reading series books back to back if I can.<br/><br/>Ultraviolet begins largely as a contemporary, then making a dramatic twist to science fiction. As I said in my review then, I really preferred the first half of Ultraviolet, with its focus on synesthesia and mental illness. Quicksilver does not have this issue, and is a much more even novel without the crazy twist that made the first book so incredibly compelling for many readers.<br/><br/>Anderson switches main characters in the second book of the series, a daring move that she pulls off brilliantly. I enjoy and the synesthetic beauty of Alison's narration, as well as how unreliable she is as narrator. However, Tori's no-nonsense, starkly honest personality captivates me. From Alison's point of view, Tori comes across largely as a stereotypical, popular, gorgeous mean girl. Now, having this window into Tori's mind, it is so apparent how much that isn't and never has been her.<br/><br/>Having made it back to Earth at the end of Ultraviolet, Alison and Tori go their separate ways, trying to settle back down despite the media frenzy at their return. When a lab begins asking questions of the Beauregards about Tori's odd genetic makeup, Tori's parents decide that the family must leave Sudbury. The family announces their move to Vancouver, but heads instead to Southern Ontario with new identities.<br/><br/>Tori, now Niki, gets a job at a grocery store and does her classes online. She remains aloof from others, including the obnoxious guy at the grocery store who reminds her of her slobbery ex-boyfriend. Her goals in life are not to be noticed and to work on her engineering, for which Tori has a passion. I love how this passion is exhibited in the chapter headings, all complex engineering terminology.<br/><br/>As is perhaps unsurprising, Tori's peace cannot last long. Sebastian arrives bringing news of trouble, and a detective is poking around looking for her. A coworker from the grocery store, Milo, gets caught up in everything and becomes her first real friend. Oh, Milo. He's Korean and athletic and such a good guy. Now that's what I'm talking about. He and Tori develop a complex bond, one that I loved to watch unfold. Also, this is the first time I've read a novel in which a main character was asexual, so that's awesome.<br/><br/>I raced through Quicksilver, intrigued by everything. Anderson pulls out all the stops and does not go easy on her characters; I saw that ending coming, but was still surprised when Anderson went through with it. Anderson's series is a must-read for science fiction fans.

Review by
4

A very original book, and wonderful companion to Ultraviolet. It is well-written, suspenseful, and not your typical YA paranormal book. Synesthesia, asexuality, racism, defying stereotypes... this book went there and more. As a sci-fi fan, I thoroughly enjoyed it, and as a female engineer I thoroughly enjoyed it that much more!

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