City Cycling, Paperback
2.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


The legendary Richard Ballantine is back! Author of the world-wide bestseller Richard's Bicycle Book, he pioneered modern cycling methods in the 1970s and went on to be a household name amongst cyclists.

Now he shares his years of experience with a new generation of cyclists.

Numbers of urban cyclists have recently exploded thanks to higher congestion and a renewed appreciation of the speed and low cost of bike journeys in town.

Richard guides the city cyclist through the pitfalls of riding in traffic, how to buy and maintain a good bike, safety and riding with confidence.

A must for anyone thinking about braving the roads and experienced city cyclists alike.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 160 pages, colour illustrations
  • Publisher: Snowbooks Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Cycling
  • ISBN: 9781905005604



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Only skimmed - Sections on different bike types, uses and basic mechanics. Useful pictures and some details on riding in traffic - BUT he advocates jumping red lights "without unduly annoying other road users" !!!! Without being noticed by any other road user might be better and legal. Loses several marks for this already.After full read:Basically very good. Clear pictures with descriptive text. It is limited in scope with a good distinction through the various types of bikes and cyclists but solely for environments involving cycling in a city. Often only overviews are provided but many links and other sources are given for more detailed information specific to your situation.However:It has some errors in it. Some trivial some less so. Some are a matter of style, but some like the jumping read lights and "using a bike to work bike solely for cycling to work" are just flat wrong. This is a shame. Richard Ballentine is a ardent cyclist with a real passion for biking, that shines in many places. There is no excuse for making mistakes of the magnitude he does. These errors detract from the entire rest of the book, for if you know you can't trust some of the information can you trusts that which is new to you.Could be so much better with very little extra effort.

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