Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio 21 : Portfolio 21, Hardback

Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio 21 : Portfolio 21 Hardback

Edited by Rosamund Kidman Cox

4.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


Presenting the year's very best wildlife images, Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio 21 is the latest memorable collection of photographs from this highly successful series.

It features all winning and commended photographs from the Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2011 competition. Taken by the world's top professional and amateur photographers, the images are not only technically flawless, but creative, innovative and surprising.

Each stunning photograph is accompanied by an extended caption that explains where and how it was taken.

This outstanding collection features a wide range of natural subjects and styles, from vivid scenes of animal behaviour and breathtaking landscapes to the beauty of plant life and pictures of urban wildlife.

Together they reveal the splendour, drama and variety of life on Earth.


  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 160 pages, Over 100 colour photographs
  • Publisher: The Natural History Museum
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Photographs: collections
  • ISBN: 9780565092986



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These portfolios always showcase jaw-dropping scenes from the natural world, but I have no idea how the judges did their job this year. The 21st portfolio stands out as an incredible collection, perfectly aranged and balanced between humour and drama, awe-inspiring and 'aww'-inspiring; the standard of photos (almost without exception) absolutely stunning.The 'wildlife photojournalist of the year award', and the winning 'The Price of Oil' was a smart inclusion, although the series has never shied away from showing the human impact upon our surroundings.I almost couldn't have picked a personal favourite this year (strong contenders; 'the paper-clip suitor' and 'trust') until I reached 'Tiny warm up', a single baby Qinling golden snub-nosed monkey with his paws tucked into his belly, staring into the camera with an expression designed to make even people who have always respected the seperateness of animals and their reliance on their natural habitats mutter a strangled <i>'I want one!'</i>