The Bumper Book of Nature, Hardback
5 out of 5 (1 rating)


When is the last time you climbed a tree? Went pond-dipping? Picked blackberries? Held a snail race? Or tracked down a badger set? If the answer is 'can't remember', or even 'never', "The Bumper Book Of Nature" will inspire you to change all that for good.

Whether you live in the heart of the city, in the suburbs or the deepest countryside, "The Bumper Book Of Nature" is a treasure trove of nature activities, ideas and information, to inspire and entertain you wherever you are.

Go pishing for birds; become a bat detective; take a city safari; find snakes and lizards; identify spiders and their webs; look for owl pellets...Make nettle soup; or itching powder from rosehips; make a bark rubbing; an elder-stem peashooter; or elderflower fritters.

Wake up in time to hear the dawn chorus; listen to the heartbeat of a tree; or just stand out in the rain for half an hour...With "The Bumper Book Of Nature" the whole family will want to switch off the television and computer, pull on their wellingtons and get outside to discover the endless bounty, beauty and fascination of nature right on our doorstep. Lavishly designed with over 160 full-colour illustrations of British wildlife and flora, along with gorgeous black-and-white line drawings throughout, this beautiful and timeless book will be treasured for years to come by children and parents alike.




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Below is the review of this book from my blog, Seasons South and North:Random House's blurb calls this hefty book a "gloriously designed treasure trove of nature activities, ideas and information to inspire the whole family to switch off the TV and computer and get outside, whether you live in the deepest inner city, by the sea or on a farm." The author, Stephen Moss, is a naturalist, writer and broadcaster, based at the BBC Natural History Unit, and this book had its beginning as an article about nature deficit disorder in The Guardian. (For a discussion of nature deficit disorder, see our posts entitled "Children and Nature", parts 1 and 2, May 2009.) While the article was raising the alarm about nature deficit disorder, the book is an effort to provide a solution.Over 250 pages long, it is no pocket guide. It has dozens of charming sketches of children at play and some lovely coloured drawings of animals and plants. It is divided into five sections of things to do: All Year Long, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. There is nothing new her, just the time-honoured activities of childhood: skipping stones, climbing trees, making daisy chains, observing birds and animals, making snowmen. What is new is that he gives detailed explanations of how to do these things. There are also some recipes, animal and plant identification guides, lots of weather lore, and suggestions of places to visit, all of them British. Thus, except for the student of childhood activities worldwide, the book will be of interest only to those based in Britain and Europe. The reader audience is of all ages. It is written in such a way that older and younger children can use it on their own, following the instructions; or parents can use it for inspiration when trying to get their children away from the screens. This does, however, give it patches that will not appeal to one reader or another. It is a book to flip through until you find just the right page to interest you, and you will. The Bumper Book of Nature is an investment, at £17.99, but it is so good, so attractive, so full of ideas and information, that it is well worth the price. For those in Europe, it may be the only nature book you need, one that will be well thumbed, and much loved.

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