The Templar Legacy, Paperback
4 out of 5 (4 ratings)


The first explosive thriller in the Cotton Malone series from a New York Times megaselling author. The ancient order of the Knights Templar possessed untold wealth and absolute power, until the Inquisition destroyed them and their riches were lost forever. But some people don't believe in 'forever'. Ex-agent Cotton Malone used to work for Stephanie Nelle in the US Justice Department.

Now Nelle wants his help to crack a series of puzzles that have confounded experts for centuries - and could lead to the legendary lost treasure of the Knights Templar. But someone else is on the trail - someone prepared to commit the ultimate crime to win the ultimate prize.

Malone and Nelle find themselves in a heart-stopping race through the villages, castles and cloisters of Europe in pursuit of a secret that, in the wrong hands, could bring the world to its knees.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 576 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton General Division
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Thriller / suspense
  • ISBN: 9780340899250



Free Home Delivery

on all orders

Pick up orders

from local bookshops


Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by

Very much in the Da Vinci Code mode, this is a argument against religion and an adventure story all rolled into one. Ex-agent Cotton Malone has abandoned the US for Denmark. His ex-boss is in the city and she wants his help keeping herself alive and finding out what exactly her husband's research was all about. One of the problems is sifting out who is the bad guys and who are the good guys. Not everyone is what they appear to be and there are choices that have to be made that could affect the future of the world.Yeah, it is another Da Vinci code only with more credible characters. However the info dumps are a little overbearing. Those people who enjoyed the Da Vinci Code will probably love this one too.

Review by

There are loads and loads of books that touch on both the Templars and Rennes-le-Chateau. Most are frankly unreadable, full of conspiracy, rampant speculation and a foolish instance that they are based on the truth.This could easily fall into the same trap, but mostly avoids it. It does contain truths, a mix of them, but like many other works of fiction they are truths used to give verisimilitude to a story. And that's what this, a good story.The dying master of the surviving Templars lays a plan to last beyond his death to hopefully uncover the legacy that was lost when Jacques de Molay was executed, but also to rid the order of a dangerously fanatical but very powerful man so that a more sensible leader may emerge. This involves the widow of a Rennes-le-Chateau "fan" and author, who (fortuitously) is head of an agency that uses special agents and she accidently recruits a recently retired agent. This works well - it gives two characters with good skills to solve parts of the puzzle but with a background well away from the core information so they are reasonably learning stuff anew and letting the author tell us the information for his plot.The old master dies, the powerful fanatic is elected to promote him, and he determines to find the answer too, laying the ground for confrontations. There are many, often fairly violent, and a trail of dead and injured knights starts to accumulate.Eventually they find their treasure, there is a final confrontation and a resolution to the story - that I won't tell you because that would be a spoiler.The only thing I really question is that the dying master has laid an incredibly complex and convoluted plan and expects it to continue smoothly after his death. By and large it does, but it seems an unnecessarily complex plan and fraught with potential disasters, would the leader of a military order really have such a plan as the future of his beloved order? But, despite that, a good read.Inevitably likened to Da Vinci Code although not sure why, there's a rather different story going on here. This one I rather liked, but then I'm not a devout Christian so people pointing out that the only reason the Church survives is that people explain away the inconsistencies in the bible by faith rather than by saying they're the writings of a group of men trying to gain and keep power - a thesis that is stated and supported pretty much that baldly in this book. If you want a much more literary version of a similar tale, you should be aiming at Foucault's Pendulum. The most obvious, screaming at the author, blunder is the anagram of "Et in arcadia ego" which apparently becomes "I tego arcana dei" or "I guard the secrets of God." Sadly the Latin for I is Ego, not I, the knights of the time were French, so they'd use Je, and actually just tego means "I guard" c.f. "Cogito ergo sum" - I think therefore I am - you don't need the personal pronouns in Latin - but if you do, choose latinate ones!

Review by

You might think that this book is in the vein of the Da Vinci Code. Who could blame you? It's about the Knights Templar, ancient secrets and Christianity as well as following an ancient trail of clues and puzzles. However, I'm glad to say that this is a deserving novel in its own right. Steve Berry has undertaken some thorough research and woven it into a tense and thrilling tale.As well as being an exiciting and fast-paced tale, the author leaves us with a bit of food for thought at the end as the great secret of the Templars is revealed. An interesting slant to a book typical of its genre.The Templar Legacy is easy to read and will entertain anyone who enjoys this type of historical thriller. Ultimately, it's more than the sum of its parts and one of the best of its kind.

Review by

An interesting thriller by Berry where you are taken to the secretive world of Templars, a quest for their treasure.An entertaining as well as an educative read.

Also by Steve Berry   |  View all

Also in the Cotton Malone series   |  View all