Reaper's Gale, Paperback Book
4 out of 5 (4 ratings)

Description

The Letherii Empire is in turmoil. Rhulad Sengar, the Emperor of a Thousand Deaths, spirals into madness, while the Errant, once a farseeing god, appears suddenly blind to the future.

Driven by the corruption and self-interest, the empire edges ever-closer to all-out war with its neighbouring kingdoms. And the great Edur fleet draws ominously ever closer.

With Karsa Orlong and Icarium Lifestealer among its warriors, that blood will be spilled is certain.

But a band of fugitives look to escape from Lether. One of them, Fear Sengar, seeks the soul of Scabandari Bloodeye, for he hopes that with its help, they might halt the Tiste Edur and so save the emperor, his brother.

But another is Scabandari's old enemy: Silchas Ruin, brother of Anomander Rake.

He carries scars inflicted by Scabandari, and such bloodshed cannot go unanswered.

There is to be a reckoning and it will be on an unimaginable scale...

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 1280 pages, Maps
  • Publisher: Transworld Publishers Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Fantasy
  • ISBN: 9780553813166

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by
4

This really is a book of two halves, one of which is the most boring thing Steven Erikson has written so far. The Awl plotline is really pretty bland and not particularly engaging, and although it has one or two important points as regards the overall arc of the series, I'm pretty sure they could have been slotted into the story different because to be perfectly honest, I didn't give a shit about Redmask. On the other hand, the latter half of the book is REALLY GOOD. I mean REALLY REALLY GOOD. I'd put this one about on a par with House of Chains; it has higher highs and lower lows than that book. <br/><br/>Also the end part of the book has all the death and NOTHING is okay. I actually had to put the book down when <spoiler> Beak died </spoiler> because I was crying so much. And then <spoiler> Trull dies</spoiler> and NOTHING IS FAIR. At least now Tehol is king of everything? Which is pretty much as it should be.

Review by
3

**** SPOILERS AHOY! ****Although not a bad entry in the Malazan series, I felt there was something off about <i>Reaper's Gale</i>. After the focused successes of <i>Midnight Tides</i> and <i>The Bonehunters</i> it's as if Erikson's old flaw of trying to do too much has resurfaced. I felt like significant chunks of the book could have been removed and little would have been lost; though I withhold final judgement on that accusation because I'm <i>still</i> not sure where exactly the Malazan series is going and what its ultimate focus is.Somewhat like <i>Deadhouse Gates</i> everything else that happens feels rushed. The Bonehunters' invasion, the sacking of Letheras, all felt somehow devoid of heft. It never carried the same emotional weight that previous Edur invasion carried. Whilst that conquest was filled with menace and foreboding, the Malazan invasion carried little in the way of emotional investment. Sure, I cared about the marines, but - and this is a constant problem I keep waiting for Erikson to address - with Tavore continuing to be a blank slate, it all felt rather hollow. Sure, Rhulad and Lether need to be taken down, but what's the <i>real</i> motivation for the Bonehunters being there? It wasn't even "We have to stop him because if we don't X and Y will happen;" it was "There's guy, apparently, who won't die, so we should probably kill him, because actually there's something - we're not going to say what - on the eastern side of this continent that's what we're <i>really</i> here for and he's kind of in the way, so might as well get rid of him while we're here."</i> Everything just felt a little weak after the extremely well-crafted five and sixth books.The various endings were a little unsatisfying too. Trull's death was a dickish move if ever I came across one, it just felt entirely unnecessary. Tehol as emperor and Byrs coming back to life? Why? It just feels wrong that Tehol would step in to the limelight like that, he never came across as the sort of person who'd want the trouble of being ruler. Rhulad's final demise? I felt that could have been handled better, in fact Rhulad seems to be an after thought in the second half of the novel, which is disappointing. And I wish Erikson had at least <i>tried</i> to broach the idea of Rhulad's past challengers and why no-one, after rumours of his immortality were widespread in Letheras, after killing him didn't chop him up or take off his head and what exactly the process was for him returning to life. Those who killed him more than once - why exactly after the first time did they seemingly just sit back and wait for him to pop up back to life again and again? Icarium? He does his usual moping around and then vanishes. I'm sure he'll be very important come the series' ultimate climax but I always find his sections tedious and somewhat pointless. Guh. I could go on and on. There were a lot of niggles in this book, but it was still quite all right. It wasn't as tedious as books 2 and 4, which had me questioning whether the series was worth continuing or not (the Malazan series being a hugely frustrating and uneven series in its quality), and I'll still keep reading on (I really have to find out where the series ends up now that I've reached the eighth book).

Review by
4

This really is a book of two halves, one of which is the most boring thing Steven Erikson has written so far. The Awl plotline is really pretty bland and not particularly engaging, and although it has one or two important points as regards the overall arc of the series, I'm pretty sure they could have been slotted into the story different because to be perfectly honest, I didn't give a shit about Redmask. On the other hand, the latter half of the book is REALLY GOOD. I mean REALLY REALLY GOOD. I'd put this one about on a par with House of Chains; it has higher highs and lower lows than that book. <br/><br/>Also the end part of the book has all the death and NOTHING is okay. I actually had to put the book down when <spoiler> Beak died </spoiler> because I was crying so much. And then <spoiler> Trull dies</spoiler> and NOTHING IS FAIR. At least now Tehol is king of everything? Which is pretty much as it should be.

Review by
4

This really is a book of two halves, one of which is the most boring thing Steven Erikson has written so far. The Awl plotline is really pretty bland and not particularly engaging, and although it has one or two important points as regards the overall arc of the series, I'm pretty sure they could have been slotted into the story different because to be perfectly honest, I didn't give a shit about Redmask. On the other hand, the latter half of the book is REALLY GOOD. I mean REALLY REALLY GOOD. I'd put this one about on a par with House of Chains; it has higher highs and lower lows than that book. <br/><br/>Also the end part of the book has all the death and NOTHING is okay. I actually had to put the book down when <spoiler> Beak died </spoiler> because I was crying so much. And then <spoiler> Trull dies</spoiler> and NOTHING IS FAIR. At least now Tehol is king of everything? Which is pretty much as it should be.

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