Gabriel's Inferno, Paperback
1.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


"Gabriel's Inferno" is the first in this intoxicating trilogy featuring Gabriel and Julia, following their sensual journey of forbidden love - with all the obsessive yearning of "Twilight" with the intensity of "Fifty Shades of Grey".

One man's salvation, one woman's sensual awakening...Gabriel Emerson is a man tortured by his dark past.

A highly respected university professor, Gabriel uses his notorious good looks and charm to lead a secret life of pleasure where nothing is out of bounds.

Sweet and innocent, Julia Mitchell enrols as Gabriel's graduate student and his immediate attraction to her, and their powerful and strange connection, threatens to derail his career.

Wildly passionate and sinful, "Gabriel's Inferno" is an exploration of the intense power of forbidden love.

Sylvain Reynard is a Canadian writer with an interest in Renaissance art and culture and an inordinate attachment to the city of Florence.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Adult & contemporary romance
  • ISBN: 9781405912419



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

This story was a let down, especially as I had read rave reviews about it. i doggedly read on, after the first hundred pages, hoping it would get better, and I'm glad I finished it. But, I guess, I'm not really interested in tortured souls, as Gabriel was, and for an inteligent woman as Julia was, she really was a wimp. I love a romance, but this didn't win me over at all. 

Review by

I couldn't sum up my feelings on this book better than breena31 did in her review. I listened to the audio version of this book and barely made it to the end. The narration probably didn't help my perception of the overly saccharin yet vapid dialogue. I read many reviews before purchasing this book and was excited for a meaty, sexy romance, but got so frustrated and intolerant of the cliche prose that I lost sight of anything I enjoyed. I also had such difficulty believing the instant connection between the characters at ages 17 and 27. What does a 17 year old girl have to offer intellectually or emotionally to a 27 year old broken man?

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