The 4-hour Work Week : Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich, Paperback

The 4-hour Work Week : Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich Paperback

2.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


This is a new, updated and expanded edition of this New York Times bestseller on how to reconstruct your life so it's not all about work.

Forget the old concept of retirement and the rest of the deferred - life plan - there is no need to wait and every reason not to, especially in unpredictable economic times.

Whether your dream is escaping the rat race, experiencing high-end world travel, earning a monthly five-figure income with zero management, or just living more and working less, this book is the blueprint. This step-by step guide to luxury lifestyle design teaches: how Tim went from $40,000 dollars per year and 80 hours per week to $40,000 per month and 4 hours per week; how to outsource your life to overseas virtual assistants for $5 per hour and do whatever you want; how blue-chip escape artists travel the world without quitting their jobs; how to eliminate 50 per cent of your work in 48 hours using the principles of a forgotten Italian economist; and how to trade a long-haul career for short work bursts and frequent 'mini-retirements'. This new updated and expanded edition includes: more than 50 practical tips and case studies from readers (including families) who have doubled their income, overcome common sticking points, and reinvented themselves using the original book as a starting point; real-world templates you can copy for eliminating email, negotiating with bosses and clients, or getting a private chef for less than GBP5 a meal; how lifestyle design principles can be suited to unpredictable economic times; and the latest tools and tricks, as well as high-tech shortcuts, for living like a diplomat or millionaire without being either.




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Helping people to leave the rat race, express themselves, etc. is a noble aim - helping them to bum around the workd while on their employer's time quite another. I had picked up this book from Mozfest and then read about it in A.J. Jacobs' "My Experimental Life", where Ferriss asks to - and ineed does - lift an entire chapter on outsourcing straight into his book, and this is seemingly typical behaviour. Ferriss boasts of using loopholes to "achieve", but is pushing people off a platform really achieving in Chinese wrestling? - I found this generally a bit unsavoury, to be honest. He does admit that one of his case studies was not keen on some of his methods, which is honest and fair enough. And I have taken an interest in some of the milder versions of his efficiency measures, such as checking email less often (but telling people you are going to do this: used today when I have a big work project in). I'm glad I didn't buy this book - but then the author would probably approve of that!

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