Four Days in November : The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Paperback

Four Days in November : The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy Paperback

4.5 out of 5 (1 rating)


Four Days in November is an extraordinarily exciting, precise, and definitive narrative of the assassination of President John F.

Kennedy on November 22, 1963, by Lee Harvey Oswald. It is drawn from Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F.

Kennedy, a huge and historic account of the event and all the conspiracy theories it spawned, by Vincent Bugliosi, famed prosecutor of Charles Manson and author of Helter Skelter.

For general readers, the carefully documented account presented in Four Days is utterly persuasive: Oswald did it and he acted alone.


  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 688 pages, 81 illustrations
  • Publisher: WW Norton & Co
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: History of the Americas
  • ISBN: 9780393332155



Free Home Delivery

on all orders

Pick up orders

from local bookshops


Showing 1 - 1 of 1 reviews.

Review by

Really gripping read - the opening section detailing the assassination and immediate aftermath was genuinely unputdownable, and the detail of it makes you feel you're involved. For the recorded events of what happened, how the Dallas PD put together a case against Oswald, the autopsy etc, it's hard to imagine there's much better. My main criticism is that it feels incomplete, which is a bit unfair because it is. I thought this was a condensed version of Bugliosi's book "Reclaiming History", but it's just Chapter 1 (at 500 pages), so a fuller discussion of the case is lacking. The larger book deals with the case against Oswald as subsequently built up (Bugliosi is firmly in the lone gunman camp) and the conspiracy theories that have been concocted about the assassination. To prove how much I liked this, I'll be buying the full book on the back of it, and it's a 1600-page hardback with a CD-rom for all the footnotes. Seriously. Only other criticism is that Bugliosi's contempt for Oswald comes over too much in his descriptions ('"a policeman hit me," Oswald whined' - ok Vince, he killed JFK and you can't stand him, we get the point). Otherwise I'd recommend this heartily to anyone interested in the event.

Also by Vincent Bugliosi   |  View all