What the Chinese Don't Eat, Paperback
4 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

Since June 2003 Xinran has been writing about China in her weekly column in the Guardian.

She has covered a vast range of topics from food to sex education, and from the experiences of British mothers who have adopted Chinese daughters, to whether Chinese people do Christmas shopping or have swimming pools.

Each of her columns inspired letters and questions and more opportunities for Xinran to shed light on the culture of her native land.

What the Chinese Don't Eat collects these pieces together for the first time to give one unique Chinese woman's perspective on the connections and differences between the lives of British and Chinese people today.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Publishing
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Literary essays
  • ISBN: 9780099501527

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
4

I bought one of the authors previous books some time ago and hadn't gotten around to reading it when I saw this book in the shop and, on a him, decided to buy it as well. As I had just finished another book I proceeded to read the book immediately and was able to get through it very quickly. This was as a result of the fact that the book isn't very long and because it is actually a collection of "column" articles that the author wrote for the Guardian (a british newspaper). The book gives a number of glimpses on how Chinese life/society/culture has changed over the last 100 years and how the "open door" policy which now allows more interaction with the West is influencing Chinese people in terms of their traditions (e.g. for a woman to not wear socks, even in the height of summer, is traditionally frowned upon) and their expectations/experiences with the West. For me, one of the most memorable passages of the book was where Xinran describes her relationship with so many different people as a fish in dirty water. I would really recomend this book to anyone who is interested in learning a bit more about the most populated country on the world which is likely to become the worlds next super power.From the back cover: In June 2003 Xinran began writing about China in her weekly column in the Guardian. She covered a vast range of topics from food to sex education, and from experiences of British mothers who have adopted Chinese daughters, to whether Chinese people do Christmas shopping. Each of columns inspired letters and questions and more opportunities for Xinran to shed light on the culture of her native land. What the Chinese Don't Eat collects these pieces together for the first time to give one unique Chinese woman's perspective on the connections and differences between the lives of the British and Chinese people today.

Review by
4

A collection of newspaper columns in book format. Very interesting for their insight into chinese life and Chinese women in Britain too.

Review by
4

Sometimes I dislike talking about good books because, well, there isn't really much to talk about them. So, what can I say about this book, really? I mean, other than it is a very informative book and easy to read? Maybe that I was expecting it to be longer and maybe even more intense, but considering that it is pretty much a collection of columns of The Guardian, I think it has a pretty good size. It talks somewhat briefly about the big differences between the Chinese and the Western culture. I feel like there could have been more depth in the book, given the fact that there is definitely a lot of information in it, but maybe even the fact that the book was not very long helped me like it a bit.

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