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High concept historical fiction, both daring and gripping

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The Outcasts of Time

From the author of the bestselling The Time Traveller's Guide to Restoration Britain, this is a stunningly high-concept historical novel that is both as daring as it is gripping, and perfect for fans of Conn Iggulden, SJ Parris and Kate Mosse. December 1348. With the country in the grip of the Black Death, brothers John and William fear that they will shortly die and go to Hell.

But as the end draws near, they are given an unexpected choice: either to go home and spend their last six days in their familiar world, or to search for salvation across the forthcoming centuries - living each one of their remaining days ninety-nine years after the last. John and William choose the future and find themselves in 1447, ignorant of almost everything going on around them. The year 1546 brings no more comfort, and 1645 challenges them still further.

It is not just that technology is changing: things they have taken for granted all their lives prove to be short-lived. As they find themselves in stranger and stranger times, the reader travels with them, seeing the world through their eyes as it shifts through disease, progress, enlightenment and war. But their time is running out - can they do something to redeem themselves before the six days are up?

Meet the Author - Ian Mortimer

Ian Mortimer is the author of the bestselling Time Traveller's Guide series. He is an experienced lecturer and public speaker and regularly appears at literary festivals around the country. He is also writes for the media.

In total, he has written twelve history books and four novels, plus numerous research articles covering various aspects of English history from the twelfth century to the twentieth. Among his special interests are social change in England since Domesday; the meaning of history; and determining the relationship between information and evidence, or, in other words, 'why do we know what we think we know about the past?' He also is a keen advocate of the public importance of history.  He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society; he was awarded the Alexander Prize by the Royal Historical Society in 2004 for his work on the social history of medicine.

He lives in Moretonhampstead, on the north-eastern edge of Dartmoor (Devon), with his wife Sophie and their three children. Hobbies include visiting historical sites, playing guitars, writing fiction as well as poetry and songs, walking in the country and running.

 

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