The World is an Apple : The Still Lifes of Paul Cezanne, Hardback Book

The World is an Apple : The Still Lifes of Paul Cezanne Hardback

Description

There is a real lack of published material on Paul Cezanne's still lifes; this groundbreaking new volume offers a complete, thematic reappraisal of Cezanne's still life paintings, looking at them both within the broader context of his complex artistic and psychological development and within the wider history of the development of still life in France and early twentieth-century modernism. Cezanne set still life painting on a new course, one that completely altered its traditionally low position within the hierarchy of French academic painting.

For Cezanne, still life became the means by which he processed his perception of things, in which he viewed shapes and objects as units that might "interpenetrate one another". Presenting twenty-two key still lifes by Cezanne, this is a major contribution to our understanding of Cezanne's life and work.

Contents: Director's Foreword; Introduction/Acknowledgement by Curator Benedict Leca; Foreword by Philippe Cezanne "Cezanne/Still Life"; Introduction: Denis Coutagne, "The Apple: Motif & cosmogram"; Essay 1: Benedict Leca, Ph.D.,"The Painter of Apples: Cezanne, Still Life and Self-Fashioning"; Essay 2: Paul Smith, "Cezanne's Colour Lab"; Essay 3: Richard Shiff, " Morality, Materiality, Apples"; Essay 5: Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, "Cezanne in the studio". Contributors to the volume include professor Richard Shiff; Effie Marie Cain, Regents Chair in Art at the University of Texas at Austin; Benedict Leca, director of curatorial affairs at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, the book's editor and exhibit's curator; Denis Coutagne, president of Societe Paul Cezanne; Nina Kallmyer, professor and chair, Department of Art History, University of Delaware; and Paul Smith, professor in History of Art at the University of Warwick.

Information

£34.95

£26.55

 
Free Home Delivery

on all orders

 
Pick up orders

from local bookshops

Also by Benedict Leca