A Conspiracy of Paper, Paperback Book

A Conspiracy of Paper Paperback

4 out of 5 (8 ratings)

Description

Benjamin Weaver is an outsider in eighteenth-century London: a Jew among Christians; a ruffian among aristocrats; a retired pugilist who, hired by London's gentry, travels through the criminal underworld in pursuit of debtors and thieves.

In A CONSPIRACY OF PAPER, Weaver must investigate a crime of the most personal sort, involving the mysterious death of his estranged father, a notorious stockdealer.

To find the answers, Weaver contends with a garrulous prostitute who knows too much about his past, estranged relatives who remind him of his alienation from the Jewish faith, and a group of powerful men in the world of finance who have disguised their business dealings with an intricate web of deception and violence.

Relying on brains and brawn, Weaver uncovers the beginnings of a strange new economic order based on stock speculation - a way of life that poses great risk for investors, but real danger for Weaver and his family.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 512 pages, map
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Crime & mystery
  • ISBN: 9780349114200

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 5 of 8 reviews.

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Review by
5

Good story, well told. I'd read another Liss novel.

Review by
4.5

Edgar-awarding winning novel by an ABD in economics. Follows the story of a Jewish pugulist (I just wanted to type that word).

Review by
3

The very first stock market crash: read about how the whole mess started and you won't be too surprised about where we have ended up. There are fun mysteries to solve along the way, and some colorful characters. Seems a little long, plot kinda drags in spots, but a good read overall.

Review by
3

The very first stock market crash: read about how the whole mess started and you won't be too surprised about where we have ended up. There are fun mysteries to solve along the way, and some colorful characters. Seems a little long, plot kinda drags in spots, but a good read overall.

Review by
4

Benjamin Weaver, the hero, lives on the fringes of the criminal world of London in the 18th century. Although born into a fairly wealthy trading family, he rejected his family and went off to be first a boxer and then, when injury ended his career, a minor criminal, committing a few muggings, house robberies, and so on, although you get the sense his heart was never in it. When the story opens, he is using his underworld knowledge in a more positive way, staying on the right side of the law, helping victims recover stolen property, finding missing persons and generally enabling polite society to deal with less polite society when it has to. He is asked to help recover some missing papers, and, separately, to investigate two suspicious deaths, and that is the start of a long and somewhat complicated plot involving corrupt dealings in the early days of the stock market. The corruption is linked to the South Sea bubble, a real stock market hype and crash, and a few of the characters are apparently historically accurate (although I had never heard of them).There is a secondary plot, revolving around Benjamin’s relationship with his family. He and they are Jewish, and Jews at that time had an uneasy if tolerated position in society. His uncle is always worried that Benjamin will do something to make the Jews look bad or to give the establishment an excuse to treat them badly. On the other hand, one of the major villains is also Jewish, and goes to the same synagogue as the uncle. Many of the non-Jewish characters are very rude to the Jews throughout the book. Although this isn’t the main plot, and I think the story could have worked without it, it does add a very interesting dimension, making Benjamin an outsider in more ways than one.There are also a few love stories and other side events to keep the plot moving along nicely. It adds up to a very good read even if you don’t care about financial fraud.

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