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A Fortress in Brooklyn : Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg, EPUB eBook

A Fortress in Brooklyn : Race, Real Estate, and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg EPUB

EPUB

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Description

The epic story of Hasidic Williamsburg, from the decline of New York to the gentrification of Brooklyn

"A rich chronicle of the Satmar Hasidic community in Williamsburg. . . . This expert account enlightens."-Publishers Weekly

"One of the most creative and iconoclastic works to have been written about Jews in the United States."-Eliyahu Stern, Yale University

The Hasidic community in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is famously one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy groups of people in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of the toughest parts of New York City during an era of steep decline, only to later resist and also participate in the unprecedented gentrification of the neighborhood.

Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper unravel the fascinating history of how a group of determined Holocaust survivors encountered, shaped, and sometimes fiercely opposed the urban processes that transformed their gritty neighborhood, from white flight and the construction of public housing to rising crime, divestment of city services, and, ultimately, extreme gentrification. By showing how Williamsburg's Hasidim rejected assimilation while still undergoing distinctive forms of Americanization and racialization, Deutsch and Casper present both a provocative counter-history of American Jewry and a novel look at how race, real estate, and religion intersected in the creation of a quintessential, and yet deeply misunderstood, New York neighborhood.

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