The Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic, Hardback Book

The Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic Hardback

3 out of 5 (4 ratings)

Description

First published in 1912, within months of the sinking of the Titanic, this historic publication is a somber yet sensationalistic look at the contemporary accounts of the time.

As set forth in the original jacket copy, this graphic and thrilling account of the sinking of the greatest palace ever built, carrying down to watery graves more than 1,500 souls gives exciting escapes from death and acts of heroism not equaled in ancient or modern times, as told by the survivors, and includes the history of icebergs, the terror of the seas, wireless telegraphy, and modern shipbuilding.

Now back in print, our collector's edition features specially commissioned illustrations and an updated package from one of London's leading design studios, Minalima, as well as photographs sourced from the Titanic Historical Society archives.

An all-new foreword deconstructs the events leading up to the great disaster and contextualizes the cultural legacy of the Titanic disaster today.

The package and design of this book sets it apart from the myriad publications sure to be released for the anniversary. Re-imagined by the same design team that brought "Harry Potter Film Wizardry" to life, it is designed to replicate the look and feel of the original 1912 publication, complete with a weathered and worn cloth-like cover, decorative ribbon marker, a hand-drawn, colour-tinted map of the ship's voyage, and gold-foil stamped pages.

Without a doubt, it promises to be a one-of-a-kind collector's item, perfect for the fan who already owns a bookshelf of Titanic-related titles and for the reader looking for something special.

Information

  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 288 pages, 300 Colour
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Inc
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: History of other lands
  • ISBN: 9780062067401

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 reviews.

Review by
3

"Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster" was an interesting look at both the Titanic disaster itself and the world of 1912. It was an interesting reprinting of a 1912 book dealing with the disaster published not too long after the event itself. It contains individual essays on various topics, reprinting of statements and articles from several different newspapers, testimony given during the Smith Committee, details of the sinking from multiples persons and numerous other personal accounts. <br/><br/>It was highly repetitive and was overly sentimental regarding the "heroic" deaths of men that could have and should have been saved, but for a useless sense of honor that dictated to them that it was better to leave a seat on a lifeboat empty than to fill it himself. Also, many of the facts contained with in were erroneous, with some even known to be so in 1912. For example, the statement "the entire length of the great ship on the starboard side was ripped" (p. 26) was ludicrous, if that had occurred Titanic would have sunk in 20 minutes, not 2 1/2 hours. Even back in 1912, the evidence did bore out this assessment. Another example would be the assertion that "the fact that the awful loss of life was avoidable by the simple provision of sufficient lifeboats" (p. 9). This was patently false, as the officers of Titanic didn't even have enough time to launch the 20 boats she did have, before her list was too great to effectively launch them, let alone the 20 that would have been needed to removing all passengers and crew. <br/><br/>Though the first hand accounts are quite interesting, as is the details included from the Smith Committee, there was far too much repetition and an excess of sentimentality to make this book an easy read; instead it is one that must be taken in small sections, spread out over days. Also, any data contained within its pages must be suspect, even the first person accounts, and thus would need to be cross-checked before being used in any sort of research paper or book. In fact, I would shy away from using it in this context, instead it might be useful when writing about the public's reaction to the disaster. <br/><br/>Finally, unfortunately, though I strove to "love" "Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster", I was unable to accomplish anything higher than merely "liking" it.

Review by
3

"Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster" was an interesting look at both the Titanic disaster itself and the world of 1912. It was an interesting reprinting of a 1912 book dealing with the disaster published not too long after the event itself. It contains individual essays on various topics, reprinting of statements and articles from several different newspapers, testimony given during the Smith Committee, details of the sinking from multiples persons and numerous other personal accounts. <br/><br/>It was highly repetitive and was overly sentimental regarding the "heroic" deaths of men that could have and should have been saved, but for a useless sense of honor that dictated to them that it was better to leave a seat on a lifeboat empty than to fill it himself. Also, many of the facts contained with in were erroneous, with some even known to be so in 1912. For example, the statement "the entire length of the great ship on the starboard side was ripped" (p. 26) was ludicrous, if that had occurred Titanic would have sunk in 20 minutes, not 2 1/2 hours. Even back in 1912, the evidence did bore out this assessment. Another example would be the assertion that "the fact that the awful loss of life was avoidable by the simple provision of sufficient lifeboats" (p. 9). This was patently false, as the officers of Titanic didn't even have enough time to launch the 20 boats she did have, before her list was too great to effectively launch them, let alone the 20 that would have been needed to removing all passengers and crew. <br/><br/>Though the first hand accounts are quite interesting, as is the details included from the Smith Committee, there was far too much repetition and an excess of sentimentality to make this book an easy read; instead it is one that must be taken in small sections, spread out over days. Also, any data contained within its pages must be suspect, even the first person accounts, and thus would need to be cross-checked before being used in any sort of research paper or book. In fact, I would shy away from using it in this context, instead it might be useful when writing about the public's reaction to the disaster. <br/><br/>Finally, unfortunately, though I strove to "love" "Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster", I was unable to accomplish anything higher than merely "liking" it.

Review by
3

"Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster" was an interesting look at both the Titanic disaster itself and the world of 1912. It was an interesting reprinting of a 1912 book dealing with the disaster published not too long after the event itself. It contains individual essays on various topics, reprinting of statements and articles from several different newspapers, testimony given during the Smith Committee, details of the sinking from multiples persons and numerous other personal accounts. <br/><br/>It was highly repetitive and was overly sentimental regarding the "heroic" deaths of men that could have and should have been saved, but for a useless sense of honor that dictated to them that it was better to leave a seat on a lifeboat empty than to fill it himself. Also, many of the facts contained with in were erroneous, with some even known to be so in 1912. For example, the statement "the entire length of the great ship on the starboard side was ripped" (p. 26) was ludicrous, if that had occurred Titanic would have sunk in 20 minutes, not 2 1/2 hours. Even back in 1912, the evidence did bore out this assessment. Another example would be the assertion that "the fact that the awful loss of life was avoidable by the simple provision of sufficient lifeboats" (p. 9). This was patently false, as the officers of Titanic didn't even have enough time to launch the 20 boats she did have, before her list was too great to effectively launch them, let alone the 20 that would have been needed to removing all passengers and crew. <br/><br/>Though the first hand accounts are quite interesting, as is the details included from the Smith Committee, there was far too much repetition and an excess of sentimentality to make this book an easy read; instead it is one that must be taken in small sections, spread out over days. Also, any data contained within its pages must be suspect, even the first person accounts, and thus would need to be cross-checked before being used in any sort of research paper or book. In fact, I would shy away from using it in this context, instead it might be useful when writing about the public's reaction to the disaster. <br/><br/>Finally, unfortunately, though I strove to "love" "Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster", I was unable to accomplish anything higher than merely "liking" it.

Review by
3

"Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster" was an interesting look at both the Titanic disaster itself and the world of 1912. It was an interesting reprinting of a 1912 book dealing with the disaster published not too long after the event itself. It contains individual essays on various topics, reprinting of statements and articles from several different newspapers, testimony given during the Smith Committee, details of the sinking from multiples persons and numerous other personal accounts. <br/><br/>It was highly repetitive and was overly sentimental regarding the "heroic" deaths of men that could have and should have been saved, but for a useless sense of honor that dictated to them that it was better to leave a seat on a lifeboat empty than to fill it himself. Also, many of the facts contained with in were erroneous, with some even known to be so in 1912. For example, the statement "the entire length of the great ship on the starboard side was ripped" (p. 26) was ludicrous, if that had occurred Titanic would have sunk in 20 minutes, not 2 1/2 hours. Even back in 1912, the evidence did bore out this assessment. Another example would be the assertion that "the fact that the awful loss of life was avoidable by the simple provision of sufficient lifeboats" (p. 9). This was patently false, as the officers of Titanic didn't even have enough time to launch the 20 boats she did have, before her list was too great to effectively launch them, let alone the 20 that would have been needed to removing all passengers and crew. <br/><br/>Though the first hand accounts are quite interesting, as is the details included from the Smith Committee, there was far too much repetition and an excess of sentimentality to make this book an easy read; instead it is one that must be taken in small sections, spread out over days. Also, any data contained within its pages must be suspect, even the first person accounts, and thus would need to be cross-checked before being used in any sort of research paper or book. In fact, I would shy away from using it in this context, instead it might be useful when writing about the public's reaction to the disaster. <br/><br/>Finally, unfortunately, though I strove to "love" "Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic: the Ocean's Greatest Disaster", I was unable to accomplish anything higher than merely "liking" it.