Coalescent : Destiny's Children Book One, Paperback Book

Coalescent : Destiny's Children Book One Paperback

Part of the Gollancz S.F. series

3.5 out of 5 (3 ratings)

Description

The beginning of a new trilogy from perhaps the most significant SF writer of the 21st century and co-author with Terry Pratchett of the Long Earth booksThe first in a new trilogy that will chart different evolutionary futures for mankind, COALESCENT is the story of a divergent strain of humanity; a hive mind, that subsumes the individual.

It is a story that begins with a vivid depiction of the decline of the Roman Empire and which, down through the years, shows how one woman's determination to protect her daughter has such frightening consequences for mankind's future existence.This is at once a stunning historical novel, a superb piece of ideas-driven SF and the intensely felt story of one man's discovery of the dark secret at the heart of his family.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 544 pages
  • Publisher: Orion Publishing Co
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Science fiction
  • ISBN: 9780575075535

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 3 of 3 reviews.

Review by
4

An interesting read, if a little slow in places. Baxter's pessimism, which I often find irritating, is not so bad in this novel and more than offset by the description detail of the Roman-era parts of the book. Looking forward to the next one in the series.

Review by
5

I love Sci-Fi that has a strong scientific component to the problems faced by believable people. In Volumes 1 and 3 of the Destiny's Children books, Baxter does this extremely well. What starts as a historical novel set in England around the fall of the Roman Empire, intertwined by the tale of a contemporary nerdish accountant trying to trace an older sister he learned about only after his father died in England.Both stories were interesting, but in the first half of the book I wondered where the science was. It did appear (and it was in the structure of the book from the start) but it was a very different kind of science than one expects to encounter in a Sci-Fi novel.I am even a practitioner of the science concerned, and found no faults in the way Baxter used it to lead to the conclusion of the story. One of the most satisfying and intellectually exciting reads I have had in several years as I began to understand what science he was using in his fiction and to see how it drove towards a particular conclusion.

Review by
2

takes a while to get going, but really liked the world building, the city underground gave a really claustrophobic feeling, but there wasn't enough threat or thrill to keep me glued to the book

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