Against All Gods : Six Polemics on Religion and an Essay on Kindness, Hardback

Against All Gods : Six Polemics on Religion and an Essay on Kindness Hardback

3.5 out of 5 (2 ratings)


Do religions have an inherent right to be respected?

Is atheism itself a form of religion, and can there be such a thing as a 'fundamentalist atheist'?

Are we witnessing a global revival in religious zeal, or do the signs point instead to religion's ultimate decline?

In a series of bold, unsparing polemics, A C Grayling tackles these questions head on, exposing the dangerous unreason he sees at the heart of religious faith and highlighting the urgent need we have to reject it in all its forms, without compromise.

In its place he argues for a set of values based on reason, reflection and sympathy, taking his cue from the great ethical tradition of western philosophy.


  • Format: Hardback
  • Pages: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Oberon Books Ltd
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Theology
  • ISBN: 9781840027280



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Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by

Masterly in its clarity and concision. Can be read at one sitting and, ideally, should be all that needs to be said on the matter.

Review by
Against all gods was a short, entertaining read, consisting of a set of seven short essays originally written as journalist-level contributions on religion to magazines and newspapers. The bundle's central concern is to argue against supernatural beliefs as a guide for human behaviour, and the point is to be deliberately direct and succinct, as required by the original medium, in order to invite further discussion (the author explicitly refers to other works published by him that do treat the subject with nuance and detail). Sometimes the same point or the same simile is recycled in several essays, but since they are only a few pages long, that's only a quibble. More importantly, after a series of essays arguing against supernaturalism, the bundle concludes with a piece arguing for humanism, careful consideration and kindness, ending on a positive note what might otherwise have been perceived as an all-negative rant.

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