The Forgotten Highlander : My Incredible Story of Survival During the War in the Far East, Paperback Book

The Forgotten Highlander : My Incredible Story of Survival During the War in the Far East Paperback

5 out of 5 (2 ratings)

Description

Alistair Urquhart was a soldier in the Gordon Highlanders captured by the Japanese in Singapore.

He not only survived working on the notorious Bridge on the River Kwai , but he was subsequently taken on one of the Japanese 'hellships' which was torpedoed.

Nearly everyone else on board died and Urquhart spent 5 days alone on a raft in the South China Sea before being rescued by a whaling ship.

He was taken to Japan and then forced to work in a mine near Nagasaki.

Two months later a nuclear bomb dropped just ten miles away ...This is the extraordinary story of a young men, conscripted at nineteen and whose father was a Somme Veteran, survived not just one, but three close encounters with death - encounters which killed nearly all his comrades.

Information

  • Format: Paperback
  • Pages: 320 pages, Section: 16, b/w photos
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
  • Publication Date:
  • Category: Memoirs
  • ISBN: 9780349122571

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Reviews

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 reviews.

Review by
5

I finished this book a few days ago, and Had to come on here and urge you to read it. It is the Story of Alistair Urquhart's (the author), experiences as a Japanese prisoner of war. He was one of the prisoners that slaved to build the bridge over the river Kwai. How he survived is a miracle only the good lord can tell you why!I cried (not often a book does this!) when he came home again to his family! Such a remarkable man, such a horrendous life he was forced to endure. And he is still around to tell his inspirational story. You have to read this book.

Review by
5

An important book. It should be mandatory reading for those at school studying history, psychology & anyone with an interest in the human condition. A terrible, terrible ordeal brought home by accessible, sparse narration. Highly recommended & very moving

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